A special Board of Trustees meeting is being held on Monday, January 30th from 5-7 pm at Central/Van Deusen. Agenda and minutes can be found on our website

Central Library’s parking lot located on the corner of Lovell and Rose St. will be closed on Sunday, January 29 due to a construction project. The library will still be open. 

Book

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  • CENTRAL: Second Floor
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Not "a nation of immigrants" : settler colonialism, white supremacy, and a history of erasure and exclusion

Call Number

  • 305.8 D899 (CEN, OSH)

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Publication Information

Boston : Beacon Press, [2021]

Physical Description

xxvii, 362 pages ; 24 cm

Summary

"Whether in political debates or discussions about immigration around the kitchen table, many Americans, regardless of party affiliation, will say proudly that we are a nation of immigrants. In this bold new book, historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz asserts this ideology is harmful and dishonest because it serves to mask and diminish the US's history of settler colonialism, genocide, white supremacy, slavery, and structural inequality, all of which we still grapple with today. She explains that the idea that we are living in a land of opportunity--founded and built by immigrants--was a convenient response by the ruling class and its brain trust to the 1960s demands for decolonialization, justice, reparations, and social equality. Moreover, Dunbar-Ortiz charges that this feel good--but inaccurate--story promotes a benign narrative of progress, obscuring that the country was founded in violence as a settler state, and imperialist since its inception. While some of us are immigrants or descendants of immigrants, others are descendants of white settlers who arrived as colonizers to displace those who were here since time immemorial, and still others are descendants of those who were kidnapped and forced here against their will. This paradigm shifting new book from the highly acclaimed author of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States charges that we need to stop believing and perpetuating this simplistic and a historical idea and embrace the real (and often horrific) history of the United States."--

Contents

  • Alexander Hamilton
  • Settler colonialism
  • Arrivants
  • Continental imperialism
  • Irish settling
  • Americanizing Columbus
  • "Yellow Peril"
  • The border.

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