Emigration Immigration (Mexico)

Illegal : life and death in Arizona's immigration war zone by Terry SterlingIllegal : life and death in Arizona's immigration war zone
Sterling, Terry
Call Number: 364.137 S8389
2010
Illegal immigration has become a hot button issue in the United States and Arizona has become the center of this controversy. More people cross into the United States from Mexico illegally via Arizona than any other border state. In spite of the increasing dangers from border guards, minutemen, kidnappers, and drug cartels, the desperately impoverished immigrants keep coming. This book by Sterling (mass communication, Arizona State U.) profiles real illegal immigrants living in the shadows of Arizona. Intended for anyone with an opinion on US immigration, this work calls for a new approach to a gross imbalance of wealth in which the finger of blame has been pointed at the poorest in question. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Midnight on the line : the secret life of the U.S.-Mexico border by Tim GaynorMidnight on the line : the secret life of the U.S.-Mexico border
Gaynor, Tim
Call Number: 364.137 G287
2009
A probing, ground-level investigation of illegal immigration and the people on both sides of the battle to secure the U.S.–Mexico borderWith illegal immigration burning as a contentious issue in American politics, Reuters reporter Tim Gaynor went into the underbelly of the border and to the heart of illegal immigration: along the 45-mile trek down the illegal alien “superhighway.” Through scorpion-strewn trails with Mexican migrants and drug smugglers, he met up with a legendary group of Native American trackers called the Shadow Wolves, and traveled through the extensive network of tunnels, including the “Great Tunnel” from Tijuana to Otay Mesa, California. Along the way, Gaynor also meets Minutemen and exposes corruption among the Border Patrol agents who exchange sex or money for helping smugglers. The issue of illegal immigration has a complexity beyond any of the political rhetoric. Combining top-notch investigative journalism with a narrative style that delves into the human condition, Gaynor reveals the day-to-day realities on both sides of “the line.”Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Dying to live : a story of U.S. immigration in an age of global apartheid by Joseph NevinsDying to live : a story of U.S. immigration in an age of global apartheid
Nevins, Joseph
Call Number: 364.13 N527
2008
Julio César Gallegos became a subject of international news in 1998 by dying while trying to join his family in Los Angeles. Nevins (geography, Vassar College, New York) begins with his story as a case study, then widens his view to discuss the people, the border, the desert, and the bodies. Documentary photographer Mizue Aizeki provides black and white illustrations. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
The immigration solution : a better plan than today's by Heather Mac DonaldThe immigration solution : a better plan than today's
Mac Donald, Heather
Call Number: 325.272 M1354
2007
The authors, three associated with the Manhattan Institute and one with the Hoover Institution, argue that no matter how hard average Mexican immigrants work, they will add less to the national wealth than they cost in terms of health care, education, and, too often, incarceration. In nine essays they assert that certain regions are overrun by illegal Mexican immigrants, that unskilled immigrants cost more than they contribute to the US economy, and that Mexican immigrants presently include too many criminals. They question Hispanic family values and the motivations of the Mexican government in matters of immigration. They believe the debate on immigration is based on arguments that are too outdated to be of any significant value, and that the US should follow other nations in immigration policies that encourage highly skilled laborers while at the same time restricting their access to social services and entitlements. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Antonio's gun and Delfino's dream : true tales of Mexican migration by Sam QuinonesAntonio's gun and Delfino's dream : true tales of Mexican migration
Quinones, Sam
Call Number: 325.272 Q77
2007
Sam Quinones's first book,True Tales From Another Mexico, was acclaimed for the way it peered into the corners of that country for its larger truths and complexities.Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream, Quinones's second collection of nonfiction tales, does the same for one of the most important issues of our times: the migration of Mexicans to the United States.Quinones has covered the world of Mexican immigrants for the last thirteen years--from Chicago to Oaxaca, Michoacan to southeast Los Angeles, Tijuana to Texas. Along the way, he has uncovered stories that help illuminate all that Mexicans seek when they come north, how they change their new country, and are changed by it.Here are the stories of the Henry Ford of velvet painting in Ciudad Juarez, the emergence of opera in Tijuana, the bizarre goings-on in the L.A. suburb of South Gate, and of the drug-addled colonies of Old World German Mennonites in Chihuahua. Through it all winds the tale of Delfino Juarez, a young construction worker, and modern-day Huckleberry Finn, who had to leave his village to change it.Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Mongrels, bastards, orphans, and vagabonds : Mexican immigration and the future of race in America by Gregory RodriguezMongrels, bastards, orphans, and vagabonds : Mexican immigration and the future of race in America
Rodriguez, Gregory
Call Number: 325.272 R6965
2007
Wide-ranging and provocative,Mongrels, Bastards, Orphans, and Vagabondsoffers an unprecedented account of the long-term cultural and political influences that Mexican Americans will have on the collective character of our nation. In considering the largest immigrant group in American history, Gregory Rodriguez examines the complexities of its heritage and of the racial and cultural synthesis--mestizaje--that has defined the Mexican people since the Spanish conquest in the sixteenth century. Rodriguez deftly delineates the effects ofmestizajethroughout the centuries, traces the northern movement of this "mongrelization," explores the emergence of a new Mexican American identity in the 1930s, and analyzes the birth and death of the Chicano movement. Vis-a-vis the present era of Mexican American confidence, he persuasively argues that the rapidly expanding Mexican American integration in to the mainstream is changing not only how Americans think about race but how we envision our nation. Deeply informative--as historically sound as it is anecdotally rich, brilliantly reasoned, and highly though provoking--Mongrels, Bastards, Orphans, and Vagabondsis a major contribution to the discussion of the cultural and political future of the United States. From the Hardcover edition.Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics