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Ghost Hunt!

One of the great rewards of parenting is remembering how to play make-believe. A perennial favorite is ghost hunt. The kids want to play a game of looking for ghosts around the house. A child proclaims that a small flashlight is actually an instrument to reveal where the ghosts have been. Ectoplasm? It’s suddenly everywhere we look!
Kids aren’t seeking to be too scared when they engage in imaginative play about scary subjects. They know how to stay in control of their own make-believe. Children’s fears and interests might inform their play as they learn how to regulate scary feelings. I’m pretty sure my job as a parent is to play along. As demonstrated by the dad in the family favorite My Neighbor Totoro, laughter is the ever available antidote to childhood fears. It also can be helpful to mix up a big batch of monster repellent in order to ward off bedtime fears.
What are some of your favorite ways to make-believe with the kids?

Book

Ghost Hunt!

Ghost Hunt!

(Parents) Permanent link

One of the great rewards of parenting is remembering how to play make-believe. A perennial favorite is ghost hunt. The kids want to play a game of looking for ghosts around the house. A child proclaims that a small flashlight is actually an instrument to reveal where the ghosts have been. Ectoplasm? It’s suddenly everywhere we look!
Kids aren’t seeking to be too scared when they engage in imaginative play about scary subjects. They know how to stay in control of their own make-believe. Children’s fears and interests might inform their play as they learn how to regulate scary feelings. I’m pretty sure my job as a parent is to play along. As demonstrated by the dad in the family favorite My Neighbor Totoro, laughter is the ever available antidote to childhood fears. It also can be helpful to mix up a big batch of monster repellent in order to ward off bedtime fears.
What are some of your favorite ways to make-believe with the kids?

Book

Ghost Hunt!

Posted by Bill Caskey at 03/29/2013 04:59:20 PM | 


A significant percentage of American children, especially children from low-income families, enter kindergarten unprepared to learn. While high-quality care from parents and other caregivers can improve children's school readiness, engaging parents and children in early intervention techniques can be difficult. Imaginative playing is one kind of care that is enjoyable for both parent and child, is easier to teach than some other interventions, and is effective in preparing children for school.
Posted by: Web ( Email ) at 4/4/2013 2:30 AM


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