Staff Picks: Music

Gaudi

Someone once asked me what kind of music I like. I didn’t really know how to answer but I guess if I had to pin it down it would be World Music. I like different sounds, voices and instruments. I am very fond of Celtic and African sounds, light Jazz and Blues and a little Alternative. Recently I read something about this weird guy Gaudi, not the famous architect, but the musician. He was recently nominated for 3 world music awards. On just one of his CDs In Between Times he has many different sounds its hard to peg them. Wow, I see why they call it world music! But, as different as it is I like it!

Music

In Between Times
10780662

I Hate Missing Great Music

It happens every year. Right after I send in my “Best of 2013” list for the KPL website, I discover a great movie, book or CD. This time it was a CD that I had listened to once, but never got into it at the time – I Hate Music by Superchunk. If you are a fan of this great indie quartet from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, then you already know that they deliver an infectious, high energy sound that is loud and short in the tradition of old school punk rock. The newest album delivers the classic Superchunk sound (one critic has coined a phrase to describe their sound – “Superchunky.”) with songwriting that has definitely matured since their early days. Lead singer, Mac McCaughan, sings about death, love and mortality while the rest of the band walks a fine line between punk and power pop. The best track of the album wins the award for being the best song under two minutes, “Me & You & Jackie Mittoo,” a track about the power of music in our lives. The song  is about how music can’t bring anyone back from the dead, but it doesn’t mean it cannot make a difference in people’s lives. The video is uplifting and totally worth two minutes of your life. So consider I Hate Music by Superchunk, an addition to my “Best of 2013” list.

Music

I Hate Music
11007352

Meditative and Melodious

Fans of the violin will want to get their ears on Daniel Hope's newest album Spheres. This is a wonderfully ecclectic array of compositions that highlight his rich and "big" violin sound. Hope has selected pieces that represent a wide range of styles (Baroque, minimalism, chill-out and cinema) and time periods (17th Century through to the present). Overall, it's a beautiful collection that really brings forth a sense of both musical and emotional continuity. Some of the composers featured are Johann Sebastian Bach, Arvo Part, Philip Glass, Karl Jenkins, Michael Nyman, Alex Baranowski, and Gabriel Faure.

Music

Spheres
10740861

Because She's Awesome, Duh

C’mon, who doesn’t love Neko Case? There are just so many reasons for why you should. If for some unfathomable reason, you’ve been able to live this long having never heard of her and the wonderfully rich music that she makes, pick up everything we have, especially her newest album, the absurdly, long winded titled The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You.

Music

The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You
11008671

The Influence of Lou Reed

Brian Eno once said that there are two kinds of artists; those who influence the general public, and artists who influence other artists. It’s hard to imagine what the landscape of popular music would look like today without the influence of Lou Reed. Lou’s roots with the Velvet Underground helped pave the way for a multitude of others, and his career as a solo artist pushed the boundaries further still.

But even if you’re not a fan of Lou’s work, chances are that one of your favorite artists is. Imagine... had there been no Lou Reed or Velvet Underground, there would likely be no Patti Smith or David Bowie or Iggy Pop. There would have been no Talking Heads, no R.E.M., no Joy Division, no Sex Pistols, or no Television. No Roxy Music or Cars or Dream Syndicate or [insert most any other contemporary artist here]. From the dark streetwise tales of Heroin and Sweet Jane to the stratospheric drone of Metal Machine Music to the full-scale crunch of his collaboration with Metallica (at the age of sixty nine, no less), Lou never failed to push the limits, and the respect he earned among his contemporaries (and fans) is nothing short of astounding.

Thanks to Lou, our world is a much more interesting place. He will be deeply missed.

Book

Lou Reed
I-geek-art-160
http://kzpl.ent.sirsi.net/client/KPL/search/results?qu=Lou+Reed&te=&lm=ALLLIBS

Folksy Fall

If you like your music with a bit of country dust on top, that leaves a folksy aftertaste shot through with a rootsy twang and a side of acoustic lyricism and sweet melody, check out these acclaimed musicians and their new and upcoming releases.

Dream River, Bill Callahan
Magpie and Dandelions, The Avett Brothers
Gone Away Backward, Robbie Fulks
The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, Neko Case
About Farewell, Alela Diane
Honky Tonk, Son Volt
Wilderness, Handsome Family  

Music

Dream River
11015183

Jonathan Butler has a great sound!

Butler is a native of Cape Town, South Africa. He started singing on the streets of Athlone for food and began touring when he was 7 years old. It’s hard to peg him because he has so many great sounds. He’s a singer, song writer and guitar player and he’s been described as a rhythm and blues, jazz and worship performer. He would probably approve of those tags because he does all of them well but I think his heart is in his gospel music. He's good! His cool jazz blends well into a gospel. And as far as rhythm and blues is concerned, I had to look the definition up and make sure I knew what rhythm and blues was. Under R&B, I saw words like urban, soul, gospel and others that would classify Butler as a contemporary R&B artist. Well, one thing is for sure, he's definitely got rhythm and he knows his blues. Still, I think Jonathan Butler would like to be best known for his uplifting, spiritual sound, which he is highly respected for.

 KPL has several of his CDs. Some of his titles are Jonathan Butler, Surrender, The Source, Do you love me? He’s on a jazz CD called Summer Horns with Dave Koz and friends. Watch for his new CD Grace and Mercy. I'm sure it, too, will have a great sound.

Music

Jonathan Butler
10131934

Harold Budd's In the Mist

Harold Budd  has been making minimalist, ambient music for a long time. Gentle and expressive, Budd’s compositions are full of open space and long pauses with instrumentation woven in between the silences. The melodic substance of a piece takes a bit of time to unfold but patient, attentive music lovers looking for an alternative to traditional, classical music genres will appreciate the Zen-like economic elegance of Budd’s work.

Music

In the Mist
10540342

Porcelain Raft

The first time I heard a Porcelain Raft (the project of Mauro Remiddi) song was their contribution to the film Celeste and Jesse Forever; an infectious, electro-pop tune called Drifting In and Out. It's a great song that epitomizes their sound: a mixture of melodic, mid-tempo numbers that are filled with lyricism and sorrow. The singing is rock solid and recalls the anguished melancholy of Jeremy Enigk's work with the band Sunny Day Real Estate. Both albums really hit the spot as the gloomier, Midwestern skies turn gray and leaden. Give it a try.

Music

Permanent Signal
11009168

 


The Sound of Summer and Magic Light

Washed Out's last album Within and Without was a breezy collection of melodic and tuneful songs bathed in a heavy coat of synthesizers, subtle jabs of electronica and the ocassional sample. Their newest record doesn't deviate much from that template so if you enjoy music that is unpreteniously simple in form, that is beautifully overgrown, whisper-soft and sensual, and that sounds like "daytime psychedelia", this is your band and album.

Music

Paracosm
11006890

Best of 2013 So Far

Every year on January 1st, I start to think about my “Best of…” list that I will be compiling throughout the year. This year is heavily tilted towards music and movies. I’m sure my recommended reading list will grow as the weather grows colder. Here is my ever-expanding list of favorite albums and a few singles that have been released this year.

Albums

  • Vampire Weekend, Modern Vampires of the City
  • Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Self Titled
  • Rhye, Woman
  • Caitlin Rose, The Stand-In
  • Jake Bugg, Jake Bugg
  • My Bloody Valentine, mbv
  • Smith Westerns, Soft Will
  • Eleanore Friedberger, Personal Record
  • Washed Out, Paracosm
  • Porcelain Raft, Permanent Signal

Singles

  • Relapse by Chvrches
  • Where Are We Now by David Bowie
  • Just Make It Stop by Low
  • Man by Neko Case
  • Life Is Hard by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros

Music

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros
10994842

 


Soft Will

The third album from the Chicago indie rock band Smith Westerns is a decent collection of very catchy, wistful rock and roll that accentuates their obvious taste for British groups like The Beatles, T-Rex, The Smiths, and Pink Floyd. There is no shortage of big, meaty hooks and gorgeous, synthed out melodies to go around on their newest long player, Soft Will.

Music

Soft will
10948678

An 80's Gem

The 1980’s produced a plethora of really, terrible music and yet as much musical detritus as should rightly ring the rim of the dustbin of history, there were groups that were visionary and prescient and whose work continues to sound fresh, new and vital today. One such album that if you knew nothing of it, would never guess that it was released in 1987 is the third Love and Rockets’ long player Earth, Sun, Moon. This was not the sound of Milli Vanilli or Huey Lewis and the News. Forming out of the ashes of Post-Punk/Goth pioneers Bauhaus, Love and Rockets’ hard to categorize album flows effortlessly through 13 wonderful songs that range from noisy rockers to lyrical folk songs and everything in between. Of course, the haircuts haven't held up as well as the tunes.

Music

Earth, Sun, Moon
10154821

 


Big Stars...but years later

Big Star, like many cult bands, only emerged from obscurity to be heralded as power pop innovators years after they had broken up. On the eve of a new documentary that chronicles their short but influential career, find out what the hype is all about by checking out their beautiful mixture of soul, pop, and rock.

Music

Keep and eye on the sky
10356154

The Vampires Have Won Me Over

I wasn’t a huge fan of Vampire Weekend before the release of their third album but I have to admit, I think they’ve hit on something special with their newest, Modern Vampires of the City. Their music is still as erudite and as catchy as ever, but where their early output came across as precious and affected, the new tunes exhibit an abundance of creative skill, lyrical depth and narrative complexity. One of the best albums of 2013, get your ears on it.

Music

Modern Vampires of the city
10810860

Sweet Talking Soul

If you’re a fan of early 70’s Soul music, you’ll want to get your hands on a couple of albums recently added to our R&B category. Having grown up a kid in the 1970’s, I definitely have a sweet spot for the beautifully crafted songs of groups and solo artists like The Manhattans, Marvin Gaye, The Delfonics, The Chi-Lites, Jackson 5, and The Spinners to name only a few. Check out the following:

The Manhattans, Sweet Talking Soul: 1965-1990
Love Train: The Sound of Philadelphia
The Delfonics, Adrian Presents the Delfonics
The Delfonics, La-la Means I Love You
The Chi-Lites, The Ultimate Chi-Lites

Music

Sweet Talking Soul, 1965-1990
10240734

No Sophmore Slump Here

Yep, she's done it again. Eleanor Friedberger, formerly of the brother/sister duo The Fiery Furnaces has released her sophmore album Personal Record and it's as great as her 2011 debut Last Summer. Friedberger composes quirky, idiosynchratic lyrics that blend seemlessly with her equally unique and recognizable voice. The music is smart, immaculately recorded pop-rock that is both innovative and endlessly catchy. Pick it up and crank it loud.

Music

Personal Record
10882727

Read It Maybe

I have a new favorite little song ditty. The original is called Call Me Maybe and is recorded by a Canadian singer Carly Rae Jepsen. I have never heard of this singer, my daughter told me about her. The song I heard and really really liked and have played several times is a spoof of this song. Toledo Lucas County Public Library did a spoof music rendition of this song and posted it on YouTube. They called it Read it Maybe and it is posted by JL Jones. In this rendition The Toledo Lucas County Public Library wants you to try a book and read it (maybe). They let you know the staff can suggest a book, and that if you have a hard time getting to the library physically that they have e-books. They show a print copy of a book and then the Nook version. They use a ton of children in the video. I found it a refreshing and a pleasing way to hear about what they have to offer. It applies to all libraries so give it a listen and then try Kalamazoo Public Library.

BTW one way I think we are better than Toledo Lucas is that they say scan the barcode and we have RFID so all you have to do is wave the book over the pad, you don’t have to try and line up the red line with the barcode. If you are checking out tens of books, and we encourage you to do so, our investment in RFID will save you time on check out and on returns. If you return a book to the central library you could slide it through our computerized book drop and it will automatically and instantaneously check in your book by reading the RFID tag as it slides down the chute. But Toledo Lucas Library has an aquarium and that is cool too.

Book

Read It Maybe
read-it-maybe-160
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sl6a7GD3dm4

Iron and Wine Gets Funky

To me, listening to an Iron and Wine album has always felt a little like being alone on a back porch with Sam Beam while he tells you secrets. How do you make that sound better? Just add horns. Ghost on Ghost, his fifth studio album, has not lost that intimate quality, but it has gained interesting musical complexity. The depth is still mainly in the vocals, but there is more to enjoy in the spaces in between. If you are a little bit folk, a little bit funk, and dig a good jazz solo, then you are likely to really enjoy this release.

Music

Ghost on Ghost
10780750

 


Funky Robot Summer Jams free with your KPL card!

The robots from Daft Punk are back after an eight year break with a new record released today and all of the new tracks are available NOW, for KPL patrons to download for free through our Freegal service. Random Access Memories is unmistakably a Daft Punk record, with the familiar vocoder and synth aesthetic, but breaks new territory with some live instrumentation thrown into the mix. The robots have collaborated with a bevy of their human musical heroes on the record and the results are often sublime, especially on THE summer jam of 2013 imo 'Get Lucky' featuring Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers. If this track doesn’t entice you to check out Freegal and all of the great free music available with your KPL card, and get you dancing at the same time, nothing will.

Music

Random Access Memories
10878829

Happy Birthday iTunes Store!

In 2001 the way the world listens to music changed when Apple introduced the iPod. Two years later, the iTunes Store opened for business offering owners of iPods a virtual place to purchase music. Over the past ten years billions of songs have been downloaded to the many Apple iOS devices. Some would argue that iTunes has destroyed the idea of a “traditional” album, but others claim that more people listen to different music because it is easier to access music. No matter how you feel, it is hard to deny that iTunes is the “King of all Media Delivery Systems.”

I was curious to find out what the most played song was in the iTunes libraries of the staff at KPL. The answers not only provided me with insight on the listening habits of staff, but also inspired me to seek out the stuff in the library.

The most played song in my iTunes library is Matthew Sweet’s “I’ve Been Waiting” from his 1991 album, Girlfriend. When I think about why this particular song is on top of the list, I recall the summer when both my daughters requested to listen to it multiple times. They liked to roll down the windows and sing along to infectious tune. My guess is the top tracks from other staff have a similar story.

“Too Late” by Shoes, Karl Knack, Audio Visual
“Fluorescent Adolescent” by Arctic Monkeys, Anne Herrington, Law Library
“Plasticities” by Andrew Bird, Susan Lindemann, Facilities Management
“Teenage Riot” by Sonic Youth, Michael Cockrell, Adult Services
“Feels Like Home” by Edwina Hayes, Jill Lansky, Teen Services
“Gobbledigook” by Sigur Ros, Rick Hale, Patron Services
“Baby Girl” by Sugarland, Andrea Vernola, Youth Services
“Dirty Little Secret” by All-American Rejects, Wendy Hand, IT
“Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” by Michael Jackson, Angela Fortin, Oshtemo
“Myth” by Beach House, Ryan Gage, Audio Visual

Music

Girlfriend
10137992

Guards

Fans of The Raveonettes, The Smith Westerns, Night Moves, The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Suede, and Arcade Fire will find something in the cliché-bloated anthem rock of the band The Guards and their newest long player, In Guards We Trust. There’s nothing particular inspiring about this record given it treads over familiar ground with its thick use of dense, multi-track vocals and heavy coats of reverb that does well to cover the rather innocuous nature of the songwriting, but then again, if you’re only looking for a couple of good songs to bob your head to while heading to the beach this summer, give it a try.

Music

In Guards We Trust
10023234

Two Young Guns of Folk and Country Rock

Two of today’s best musical young guns that have delivered strong albums this year are Jake Bugg and Caitlin Rose. They don’t shy away from their influences but they don’t let those who paved the musical highway for them subsume their individual voices either. Gritty and fashionable enough for the with-it crowd and accessible enough for those who have an Oasis or Taylor Swift album in their collection, these two will hopefully be in it for the long haul. Bugg has been compared to Dylan (who hasn’t?) but his brand of neo-folk has as many roots in Brit Pop. Sure, he evokes both Dylan and Donovan from time to time but he makes it work because of his lyrical earnestness and the sheer catchiness of the tunes. Rose also wrote the album that Swift only can dream that she had created. These are confidently written songs sung by a fresh voice who no doubt has listened to a few Jayhawks albums over the years. Check them both out!

Music

The Stand-In
10079844

Stay Classy

For many years, the library’s musical collection consisted mostly of jazz, world and classical music. Over the past 6 or 7 years we’ve really added to that mix, many popular, alternative, hip hop, and rhythm and blues titles. We still continue to order symphonic, choral, opera, baroque and postmodern music but not nearly with the emphasis we once had given the popularity of Top 40 artists. Having said that, classical music lovers, including myself, will likely be able to find what they’re looking for. Here are some of my favorites, all of which we currently own. Stop in and browse the collection. 

Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings
Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 (Adagietto)
Erik Satie’s Trois Gymnopédies
J.S. Bach’s Sleepers Awake
Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata
Karl Jenkins’ Agnus Dei
Philip Glass’ Company
Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus
Henryk Gorecki’s Symphony No. 3

Music

Silver Violin
10051022

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy

As I was reviewing the lineup for the summer concert series at Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, I came across a few artists/groups unknown to me. Having now spent a considerable amount of time researching those, I have a new favorite, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, and I can’t wait to go see them in August.

Among other performers coming to Meijer Gardens that are of particular interest to me: Michael Franti and Spearhead, Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers, The John Butler Trio, Grizzly Bear, David Byrne & St. Vincent, Pink Martini and Sheryl Crow

Music

Rattle Them Bones
10739644

Record Store Day 2013

Don’t forget that Saturday, April 20, is Record Store Day. Independent record shops (like independent booksellers) could be dying breed; don’t let that happen. Stop by your favorite music store on Saturday and buy a few things; let them know you care. Some stores will have exclusive first releases and limited editions not available anywhere else. Who knows, you might find something you didn’t even know you wanted. (Of course, not all stores will carry all releases and some releases will sell out.) So tell your Facebook friends, tell your analog friends, tell anyone who will listen.

“The official film of Record Store Day 2013”

Here’s a trailer from The Last Shop Standing: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of the Independent Record Shop, a critically acclaimed documentary directed by Pip Piper, and based on the book by Graham Jones.

 

 

Book

Record Store Day
rsd-logo-160
http://www.recordstoreday.com

3 Good Albums

Fans of his band the New Pornographers will find much to like when listening to A.C. Newman’s newest solo album Shut Down the Streets. Newman is one of power pops most prolific and talented stewards and yet while there are plenty of energetic, signature anthems to chant to this summer while headed to the beach, his newest batch of songs takes a more personal and introspective turn.

Several years ago, the band Vampire Weekend were notable for successfully bringing to the ears of listeners of indie rock an Afro Pop sensibility to their catchy, pop songs. The Florida band Surfer Blood also weaves together a variety pack of genres including surf rock (Dick Dale, The Ventures), fuzzy power pop (Weezer, Waaves, The Shins) and subtle hints of Afro Pop rhythms that never sound out of place or gratuitous. Their 2010 album Astro Coast perfectly captures much of how today’s best indie rock groups are concerned with writing catchy, dance-friendly tunes, but doing so with the kitchen sink of instrumentation and influence at their disposal.

One of the best albums of 2013 is Youth Lagoon’s Wonderous Bughouse. This band knows how to bug out with effortlessly, rolling psych-pop that will get inside your brain, pitch a tent and remain there for hours afterward. Fans of The Flaming Lips, Beach House, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, MGMT and Sparklehorse will find much to like about this sonic flood of colorful melodies and low-end production.

Music

Wondrous Bughouse
10079870

Museum of Flight

A friend from Seattle turned me on to the music of Damien Jurado a couple of years ago so I was excited to stumble on a new cd of his, Maraqopa, as I browsed the KPL new music section.  Now I can't stop listening to this mixture of what Larry Fitzmaurice at Pitchfork calls, "soft-psych freak-outs, rainy folk, haunted 1960's pop, and slow-burning oddball sparseness." I googled Jurado and found out I'm a Johnny-come-lately to his music as he has been around since the mid 90's, releasing albums with Sub Pop Records and now with a label based in Indiana called Secretly Canadian.  If you like Neil Young and the Fleet Foxes give Jurado a try or come and browse our music section and see what you discover.

Music

Maraqopa
10665360

More Than Just an Actor

The singer Emmy Rossum is known mostly for her various television (Shameless) and film performances (The Phantom of the Opera) but she also has the trained pipes of an accomplished singer. We’re not talking about the sort of actress, who uses their fame to influence the music industry to play along with their middling vocal talents (see: Scarlett Johansson). Rossum can truly bring the noise as she clearly shows in her new album Sentimental Journey, a collection of old timey jazz standards (Autumn Leaves, Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out) and retro-swinging country (Things, Pretty Paper). The album is on order so keep an eye out for it. It will be here soon. Listen to some of her renditions here.

Music

Sentimental Journey
10023259

Kevin Ayers & Peter Banks (R.I.P.)

Last week, I wrote about the passing of Alvin Lee, arguably one of the world’s great guitarists. They always say these things happen in threes.

Just a few weeks beforehand, February 18 to be exact, we lost Kevin Ayers. Ayers was a key player in Britain’s Canterbury scene during the late 1960s. He was a founding member of the band Soft Machine, and an active solo artist. Ayers’ list of early collaborators reads like a Who’s Who of influential artists; from Brian Eno, Nico and  John Cale (June 1, 1974), to Floydian madman Syd Barrett, Elton John, Robert Wyatt, Mike Oldfield, and others. His first solo album, Joy of a Toy, was released on EMI’s new Harvest label in 1969, right beside early (now classic) releases by Deep Purple and Pink Floyd. His sixteenth and last studio album, The Unfairground, was released in 2007 to much acclaim. Ayers was 68.

This week, one more member of “British Rock Royalty” joined his departed contemporaries. Peter Banks was a founding member and the original guitarist in the prog band Yes. He was featured on the band’s first two recordings, Yes and Time and a Word, before being replaced by Steve Howe in 1970. He achieved a certain degree of success with the UK band Flash during the mid-1970s. An occasional series of solo albums followed during the 1990s. Banks passed away in London on March 8 at the age of 65.

Some great early footage of Yes with Peter Banks (and later with Steve Howe) follows...

  

Music

The Unfairground by Kevin Ayers
10200141
http://kzpl.ent.sirsi.net/client/KPL/search/results?qu=The+unfairground&qf=AUTHOR%09Author%09Ayers%2C+Kevin.%09Ayers%2C+Kevin.&lm=ALLLIBS&rt=TITLE%7C%7C%7CTitle%7C%7C%7Cfalse

Alvin Lee has Gone Home

The music world bid farewell to another guitar great on Wednesday with the passing of Alvin Lee. During the late 1960s and 1970s, the British born Lee fronted the band Ten Years After, and set the world on fire at the Woodstock Festival in August 1969 with “I’m Going Home.” Lee was known for his lightning fast guitar work and sensitive interpretations of blues standards and his own compositions. Lee recorded nearly 30 studio and live albums during his career—to this day, Ten Years After Recorded Live remains one of my own “desert island” selections… most notably for its incendiary cover of Sonny Boy Williamson’s “Help Me.” His latest album, Still on the Road to Freedom, was released last year. Lee was 68.

Book

Alvin Lee
alvin-lee-160
http://alvinlee.com/

A Late Musical Valentine

One of the best alt-country CDs of 2012 was Rhett Miller’s, The Dreamer. Miller, the longtime front man of the Old 97’s, has once again proven that he is one of the best songwriters in music. What I love best about Miller’s solo material is that he is not afraid to dabble in many different music styles, like power pop and folk. The Dreamer is pure alt-country and closer to a new Old 97’s record than his previous releases.

The first track “Lost Without You” starts slow then picks up with a twangy edge that mixes perfectly with Miller’s voice. The song “Out of Love” blends aspects of power pop with the unmistakable instrumentation of bluegrass. “As Close As I Came to Being Right,” a duet with the great Rosanne Cash, is as close as you can get to a perfect alt-country love song. Miller is an underrated talent that deserves more accolades for his contributions.

After listening to The Dreamer you will realize that at its core, Miller has crafted a letter to the idea of love in all its forms. Check it out and treat yourself to a late Valentine.

Book

Rhett Miller - The Dreamer
rhett-miller-dreamer-cover
http://kzpl.ent.sirsi.net/client/KPL/search/results?qu=rhett+miller&te=&lm=ALLLIBS&rt=AUTHOR%7C%7C%7CAuthor%7C%7C%7Cfalse

Roxy Music Meets 1920s Jazz

I’m usually not a fan of musicians rearranging and rerecording their own music from an earlier period. Songs or albums tend to speak to a certain time or place in an artist’s life and in our cultural milieu (even the songs and albums that are timeless), and revisiting songs years later—in a studio, not in a live setting—can come off as tired and hackneyed.  Yet when I heard that Bryan Ferry reinterpreted a handful of Roxy Music classics as instrumental jazz songs, I was first intrigued and then surprisingly delighted.  The songs on the Brian Ferry Orchestra’s The Jazz Age sound like authentic 1920s compositions, made by musicians who clearly admire and understand the jazz music of that time period.  The songs sound so radically different, I had to listen to the album a few times before I recognized some of my beloved Roxy Music favorites.  The album is fun and enthusiastic, and although it doesn’t replace the original Roxy Music songs, it’s a pleasure to hear.

While we don’t have The Jazz Age in our CD collection, it is available through Freegal.  Freegal is a downloadable music service that allows resident borrowers to download three songs a week with their library card.  Check out The Jazz Age and then see what else Freegal has to offer!

For comparison, here's a video of Roxy Music performing "Do the Strand" on the BBC in 1973:

And here is a one-minute snippet of the same song from The Jazz Age:

Book

The Jazz Age by the Bryan Ferry Orchestra
ferry-orchestra-jazz-age-cover-160
/music/freegal/

Bargains from the Basement: Dead Bees on a Cake

“If you go out searching for jewels and treasures elsewhere, you're liable to miss the acres of riches that lie beneath your feet.”—Bryan Cohen

Today’s buried treasure from the Friends Bookstore is a tasty musical offering by David Sylvian, Dead Bees on a Cake, released in 1999. If you’re not already familiar with Sylvian’s work, give his material a listen. Who to compare him to? His voice draws an obvious similarity to Bryan Ferry, but musically, Sylvian is more muted and much more diverse; closer say to a Peter Gabriel or a Daniel Lanois—dark, mysterious at times, but rich and deeply moving.

Sylvian is an excellent songwriter who typically surrounds himself with contemporary musical heavyweights. Bees, however, follows a series of more upbeat “prog-ish” collaborations with Robert Fripp, so a musical departure seems somewhat inevitable. Bees has a slightly more jazzy, worldbeat feel than its predecessors—very much in the same vein as the later period recordings by Talk Talk. Guest musicians, though few this time, include jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, composer and pianist Ryuichi Sakamoto, and a brief appearance by Steve Tibbetts. Sylvian’s discography calls this release “openly celebratory in nature… documenting an eventful and transformative period in his life.”

Thanks once again, Friends – a good find, indeed!


friends-logo-50.jpg

Consider this little series my own version of “Flea Market Finds,” an ongoing report of the latest bargains unearthed in the lower level of Central Library. What a treasure we have (quite literally) in the Friends Bookstore. When you can grab high quality books, music, and movies for little more than pocket change, life is good. And all the proceeds go to a great cause, too. So shop often; you never know what you’ll find. And stay tuned… I’ll let you know what I find!

Book

Dead Bees on a Cake by David Sylvian
dead-bees-on-a-cake-160
/friends/bookstore/

Shoegazers Celebrate

Well, well, My Bloody Valentine has finally emerged from their twenty-plus year hiatus to release the much anticipated and discussed new album mbv. Until we can obtain the new long player for the library’s music collection, you’ll just have to find out what all of the hype is about by listening to their beloved 90's classic Loveless.

Music

Loveless
10132326

Solange and Beyoncé

I bet it’s a bit daunting to make music when your sister is Beyoncé, but Solange is doing well for herself. I enjoyed the Motown feel of her 2008 album Sol-Angel and the Hadley Street Dreams, but I’m loving her new EP True. Both are available for checkout at KPL. 

 And for anyone who just can’t wait until the Super Bowl half-time show, KPL has plenty of Beyoncé and Destiny’s Child for your listening pleasure.

Music

True

10019702

 


Night Moves

The Minneapolis band Night Moves are difficult to categorize but their debut album should be on everyone’s iPod. They draw from an array of rock and roll influences, stitching their lyrical elements together to form a solid sound of catchy tunes born of fuzzed out, alt-country mixed with glam-rock grooves. Standout songs include Horses, Country Queen and Headlights.

Music

Colored Emotions
10008202

Featuring Norah Jones

I have always been a big Norah Jones fan.  She is one of the few artists to have passed a tough test in my household:  I can play Come away with me in my alarm clock every morning to wake me up and I still enjoy the CD.  There are not many CDs that stand up to this test.  So you can understand my pleasure when I discovered a Norah Jones CD that I hadn't heard before in the KPL collection.  It's called Featuring and is a CD of duets and collaborations between Jones and a wide variety of singers and musical groups.  And when I say "variety", I mean it!  This CD is so neat in that it showcases how versatile Jones is with her distinctive and soulful voice pairing her with artists and groups such as Willie Nelson, Ray Charles, the Foo Fighters, and Ryan Adams.

The CD starts strong with a track from The Little Willies.  Jones and friends formed The Little Willies in 2003 and came out with their second album For the Good Times in 2012.  (You can also find them on another excellent CD in the library's collection:  Putumayo presents Americana.  It's bound to put you in a good mood!)  I was unfamiliar with Sasha Dobson prior to this CD, but her duet, Bull Rider, is fantastic!  I have requested her CD through MeLCat and look forward to become more acquainted with her music.  Halfway through the CD, Jones and friends adopt a totally different style in Take Off Your Cool with Outkast, Life is Better with Q-Tip, and Soon the New Day with Talib Kweli.  A few songs later, there is a duet with Ray Charles…need I say more?  Who doesn't like Ray Charles??  But then, in my humble opinion, the CD reaches its pinnacle with track 15:  Creepin' In with Dolly Parton.  I love Dolly.  Always have and always will.  This song makes me want to dance and sing over and over again as I play it on repeat.

Basically, what I hope this blog conveys, is that this compilation of songs is wonderful.  Each and every song is as delightful as it is different.  I highly recommend this CD for your listening pleasure.

Music

Featuring
10451402

Frank's Ocean - Care for a Swim?

It’s not even summer anymore (far from it, actually) and yet I’m still listening to this album on a relatively consistent basis. It’s just a good album. For all the controversy that surrounded Frank Ocean’s personal life in the mainstream pop scene, it’s a shame that certain critics disregarded the music and assumed it was all merely a PR gimmick to sell albums.

Truth is: even if Frank Ocean’s “coming outwas an expertly timed plan to garner popularity, he didn’t need it. The music stands brilliantly enough on its own legs. Quite FRANKly (harharhar), this is just what modern R&B should sound like.

I can respect the fun aspect of a well-produced Usher, Chris Brown, or Rihanna song as much as the next person from my generation. They’re fun in a party/club setting. But Channel Orange is just on a completely different level. The lyrics are far more diverse and compelling, and the music is actually unique and complex. There are moods and ideas represented on the album besides the standard “Hey, let’s party.” and “You’re a person I’m attracted to. Isn’t that wonderful?!” It all has a unified feel and tone, like there was a real attempt to make an album, as opposed to just a collection of singles. And even the songs that have more of a “good-time, fun-loving” feel to them still retain an organic edge that sets them apart from their contemporaries.

It’s intimate but vulnerable stuff. It feels real. It feels more like art than industry. That’s a big deal for music within any modern or contemporary category. And hey, I'm still listening to the album 6 months after its release. So, hats off to Frank!

Music

Channel Orange
10730854

When? Where? WHO?

I never really was much of a Who fan. I was familiar with a fair amount of their popular hits, and had dabbled in listening to some of their albums throughout my fairly brief existence on this planet, but never really felt much connection or excitement with the music. However, a friend of mine recently introduced me to some of their live material; that’s when I realized just how ignorant I was all along.

Most people are actually quite familiar with The Who’s crazy live repertoire (my ignorance was in the minority) but I still feel the urge to point out the obvious: Keith Moon’s drumming is frantic and insane; John Entwistle has the coolest bass style of probably anyone to have ever played rock music; Pete Townshend conjures tones from his Hiwatt stacks that sound like demons riding a chainsaw; and Roger Daltrey supplies the perfect vocals to carry the band powerfully from song to song.

It’s good stuff. I wish more modern bands could compete with the raw, on-stage energy that The Who dish out consistently from track to track. It’s a total domination of the stage and audience, and it’s totally awesome even 40+ years later.

Music

Live at Leeds
UMM261825C