Staff Picks: Music

An Original Soul Singer

Singer Billy Stewart had chart success during the 1960's with hits like Fat Boy, Summertime, Sitting in the Park, Secret Love, and You Reap What You Sow and while he's not as well-known as the Motown label singers or James Brown, Stewart possessed and original style all his own that's worth checking out if you're a fan of old school rhythm and blues. His signature trademarks were improvising, scatting and rolling his tongue, all of which provided his vocal interpretations with a unique vitality. Tragically, Stewart died at 33 from an auto accident in 1970. For those new to his sound, try this excellent compilation that includes Stewart's recordings on the famous Chess Records label.

Music

One More Time: the chess years
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RyanG

Classics from the 60's, 70's and 90's

75 classic soul tracks from the vaults of Motown! That's right, 75 classics! Motown-produced music is my go-to, annual soundtrack to Michigan summers. This compilation brings forth the great music from the era's titans (Mary Wells, Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, The Miracles, The Supremes, etc.) but it also includes a few lesser known names like The Downbeats, The Valadiers, Paul Gayten, Lamont Dozier, and Barrett Strong.

Marc Bolan (aka T-Rex) was the man behind the boogie-woogie glam rock that came to define the sound of early 70's British music. Mixing campy looks with big guitar hooks, T-Rex banged out several pop anthems including 20th Century Boy, Telegram Sam, Bang a Gong, and I Love to Boogie. 

This year marked the 20th anniversary of the death of Kurt Cobain and the subsequent dissolution of his band Nirvana. After being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this year, Nirvana continue to be the band most associated with the rise of alternative music into the mainstream during the 1990's.

Music

Soul of Detroit
10939851
RyanG

A Rainy Day Playlist

Oh rainy day, what should I play? If you’re anything like me and you appreciate the ocassional dark skies and leisurely fall of rain, your playlist is probably a reflective collection of moody and somewhat somber tunes. On days like today, Classical, Film Scores and Jazz reign (pun intended).

How about a little music from the film Magnolia’s soundtrack:



Keeping with film scores, nobody does gloomy and melodic better than Philip Glass:

 

Often lumped in with the French Impressionism of Maurice Ravel and Claude Debussy, Erik Satie's hauntingly simple music evokes nostalgia and memory:

 

In her heyday, Billie Holiday's singular style was unmatched in expressing the depth of human emotion:

Two titans of modern music, Aaron Copland and Benny Goodman:

And lastly, the beauty and simplicity of The Beatitudes as performed by The Kronos Quartet and featured in the film The Great Beauty:

 

Music

Piano Works Satie
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RyanG

Liked That, Try This No. 2

Looking for artists similar to those you already know about and enjoy? Well, we’ll try to make suggestions that expand your musical listening experience. Don't forget, you can access music from KPL through compact discs, free MP3 downloads (Freegal) and internet streamed albums via Hoopla.  

• Liked Beach House, try Wye Oak
• Liked Steve Earle, try David Allan Cole
• Liked Pavement, try Parquet Courts
• Liked Solange, try Kelis
• Liked Bruno Mars, try Fitz and the Tantrums
• Liked early Pink Floyd, try Tame Impala
• Liked Lorde, try Sharon Van Etten

Music

Shriek
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RyanG

Unrepentant Geraldines

“I can remember where I come from.”

That line is from a 1992 Tori Amos song entitled “Mother,” a beautiful piano ballad about leaving home, or maybe leaving what you know. It’s really more of a plea than an assertion—a fear about forgetting what makes us who we are. The song, one of my personal favorites, is off her first album, Little Earthquakes, and now—22 years and 13 albums later—Tori brings that idea full circle with her latest LP, Unrepentant Geraldines. In the song “Oysters,” she sings, “I’m working my way back to me again.” Exploring the self or being self-aware is a common thread throughout all of her albums, but it resonates particularly strongly with Geraldines, in part because the album seems to be a return to form for her—that is, it’s more piano-based, simple storytelling/songwriting than some of her recent high-concept albums. I could easily hear a song like “Weatherman” nestled between the songs on 1994’s Under the Pink or “Selkie” sitting alongside the best of her early B-sides. Don’t get me wrong—this isn’t Tori trying to relive past glories; the songs are much fresher than if she were trying to replicate what she’s already done. Unrepentant Geraldines comes from a different place than any of her early work, from a maturity that only comes with time—whether that means writing about aging (“16 Shades of Blue”), being a mother (“Rose Dover” and “Promise”), or corporate greed/religious oppression (“Unrepentant Geraldines”). Her early work will always be my favorite, but I’m happy to have an album like Geraldines that, over 20 years after I first started listening to her, speaks to me.

If you’ve liked any of her previous work, I’d give this album a try. In addition to the CDs we have in our collection, you can find almost every Tori Amos album, including Unrepentant Geraldines, on Hoopla. What isn’t on Hoopla—Scarlet’s Walk, The Beekeeper, and American Doll Posse—is available on Freegal.

 

Music

Unrepentant Geraldines
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CaitlinH

Some Autumn for Your Summer Listening

Fans of the band Wilco may already be aware of Chicago’s The Autumn Defense given two of its members are Wilco’s bassist (John Stirratt) and keyboardist (Pat Sansone). But those who love laid back, radio-friendly songwriting that echoes the early and mid-1970’s work of tunesmiths like Bread, Emitt Rhodes, Big Star, ELO, The Carpenters should check them out. Their newest album, Fifth came out this week and it’s full of sweetly polished folk-pop that’s perfect for a summer breeze.

Music

Fifth
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RyanG

Nikki Lane: Now on Hoopla

If you dig the music of The Black Keys, Caitlin Rose, The Ronettes, Wanda Jackson, and She and Him, head on over to our free streaming service called Hoopla and borrow the newest album from Nikki Lane, a new singer from Nashville whose songs strike a nice balance between vintage country and girl group pop. Produced by Dan Auerbach (guitarist from The Black Keys) All or Nothin’ will be here in compact disc format soon but if you can’t wait, stream it from Hoopla now for free.

Music

All or Nothin'
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RyanG

A Beautiful and Well Organized Mess of an Album

St. Vincent’s (aka Annie Clark) newest, self-titled album is an idiosyncratic mess, a beautiful and infectious tangle of weirdness that comes at you like a curveball with a sensibility that knowingly preserves accessibility while challenging it. Cobbled together from too many genres, styles and sources to adequately summarize here, her fourth album is her most adventurous yet. She confidently pushes her sonic palate in new and colorful ways that exhibits her varied musical interests and how effectively she is at mixing and matching tones and textures. It’s a contemporary sounding mulligan stew of digital beeps and bounces, spacey synthesizers, cheesy guitar riffs, funky rhythms, and gorgeous melodies. In other words, wait for the next track and you’ll hear something you weren’t expecting. It took me a couple of listens for this to sink in and make sense. There’s no doubt that some will be turned off by the cornier stuff, but overall, it’s a strong album that at times, conjures the kind of boundless vision and openness to challenge found in David Bowie’s albums.

Music

St. Vincent
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RyanG

Raphael Saadiq

Raphael Saadiq has been around for quite a while. He came as a surprise to me because his vintage sounds. He seems extremely talented and is well packaged. He initially played with Tony! Toni! Tone! Over the years he has worked behind the scenes as a producer for some top names like, John Legend, Joss Stone, Stevie Wonder, Mary J Blige and the list goes on to some surprising other great artists.

What I really like about him is that he is very versatile. Raphael Saadiq is a singer, songwriter, guitarist and a record producer. I’ve read that his heroes are Chuck Berry, Stevie Wonder, Sly Stone and Little Walter. He says he wants to be a throwback with a futuristic twist. That certainly comes through on his latest CD Stone Rollin. That CD took me back to the 50s and 60s. It also had me reminiscing about Sam Cook. There are many great sounds and it is a great show of talent. It’s definitely R&B at its finest and it had me rolling.

Music

Stone Rollin
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JudiR

A New Twist on 80's Rock

Catchy dream pop that echoes its 1980’s influences while securely fixed to the contemporary is at the core of a new, brilliantly assured album from The War on Drugs. Littered with unhurried rhythms and languorous melodies that unfold like a sunny day at the beach, these are perfectly realized songs that effectively reconfigure 80’s rock anthems into a collection of hazy ballads delivered with a lament filled sneer. The group’s previous album, Slave Ambient, was a collection of songs that were a spacey blend of Spiritualized, Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan. With their newly released album Lost in a Dream, the group takes this approach to an even more airy and casual place, breathing even more grooves around the swirl of reimagined 80's rock and dreamy synthesizers. This will be one of the best rock albums of the year. Check it out.

Music

Lost in a dream
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RyanG