Staff Picks: Movies

Staff-recommended viewing from the KPL catalog.

Cannes Film Festival Winners

This year’s Cannes Film Festival winners included Winter Sleep (Best Film), Bennett Miller (Best Director), Julianne Moore (Best Actress) and Timothy Spall (Best Actor). Here’s a look back at some of the films that have previously been awarded the prestigious Palme d’or. 
 
Black Orpheus—1959
The Leopard—1963
Paris, Texas—1984
Blowup—1967
The Conversation—1974
Pulp Fiction—1994
Taste of Cherry—1997
Missing—1982
The White Ribbon—2009
Taxi Driver—1976

Movie

Black Orpheus
10437912

 

RyanG

Jarmusch's Independent Vision

Jim Jarmusch’s films are not for everyone. They are, however, incredibly influential and important in the history of American cinema. Slowly paced with quirky characters, his droll, often minimalist films explore the ironic and humanistic with equal attention. His films feel very American (the America on the margins that is) while at the same time, they are populated with Italian cabdrivers (Night on Earth), teenage Japanese tourists obsessed with early rock and roll (Mystery Train), and Hungarian immigrants (Stranger Than Paradise). His most accessible and mainstream movie to date is Broken Flowers, due in large part because of Bill Murray’s great performance as a romantically failed, wealthy introvert who wears retro sweat suits while sitting in the dark (during the day), watching television. It’s only when he receives a mysterious letter from one of his ex-girlfriends, suggesting that he has a son he never knew about, does he set out on a personal journey toward…well, maybe nothing and maybe everything. The moments within a journey are what fascinate Jarmusch about the human condition rather than a tightly sewn conclusion to a story. His cult classics Down by Law and Stranger Than Paradise cemented his reputation as an indie sweetheart with a wry sensibility and skill for reimagining genre and form by the early 1990’s. The release of his newest film (Only Lovers Left Alive) will once again shine the light on one of America’s most idiosyncratic, independent filmmakers.

Movie

Broken Flowers
10106712
RyanG

Without a Sound

Most of us prefer sound with our visual imagery when it comes to movie watching. However, if you’re looking to challenge yourself to experience visual poetry and storytelling in new ways without the element of music or dialogue, here’s a quick introductory sampler of well-regarded works.

The Artist
Vampyr
Battleship Potemkin
People on Sunday
The General
The Dictator
Le Quattro Volte (sound, but no dialogue)
The Passion of Joan of Arc
City Lights
Metropolis
Sunrise

Movie

People on sunday
10487209
RyanG

Annie Hall

I first saw Annie Hall in 1977 when it first came out in theaters. I was on a date with my now wife, who was living in Basel Switzerland at the time. The movie audio was in German and I had to read the English subtitles. I thought maybe that attributed to my not understanding or not generally getting this movie. Annie Hall won the 1977 Academy Award for Best Picture and was a turning point for Woody Allen. So when KPL got this movie in on DVD I thought I would view it again. The movie is about Alvy Singer (Woody Allen) and his relationship with Annie Hall (hence the title of the movie) (Diane Keaton). It delves into Alvy and Annie’s thoughts, feelings, dealings with life or in Alvy’s case his fascination with death. Alvy is Jewish and lives in New York city and is a comedian twice divorced. Annie is undeveloped. Through her relationship with Alvy she grows, goes to community college, reads, sees a therapist and sings on stage. In typical Woody Allen style throughout the movie we see flash backs to other relationships, we see present day Alvy in past day parent’s house under the roller coaster. The part I like is when in the middle of a scene he starts a narration with us the viewer through the camera or he does a scene in a scene. For example while in line to see a movie the guy behind him complains about a director, Alvy does not want to hear this and thinks the man does not know what he is talking about. Then Alvy talks to the camera telling us that the man does not know what he is talking about, the man steps into the camera and tells us he teaches film at Columbia. Alvy then pulls the actual Director out from behind a screen and has him argue with the man. Then Alvy comes back to talking to us through the camera and says don’t you wish life was like this. Annie Hall is deemed a classic, I think I got more out of it this time around, mostly because there now is an internet and I read up on all the reasons this is supposed to be a good movie. If I had only just watched it again I think I would still leave shaking my heard. Only this time I would not be out some major dollars (actually they were Swiss Francs, this was way before the Euro). Getting the DVD for free from KPL is a good deal. BTW after the movie we got a drink at the plaza and they had orange plastic giraffes in them as stirring sticks. I still have the plastic giraffe and I still have the date (now wife) and I still do not understand Annie Hall.

Movie

Annie Hall
10028042
Gary

Top Critics: 20 Best Films of 2013

In case you needed one last, post-Oscars list to use for upcoming checkout's. According to a survey of the editors and contributors of Film Comment magazine, these are the Top 20 films of 2013. Some have been released on DVD and others have yet to hit the shelves.

  1. Inside Llewyn Davis
  2. 12 Years a Slave
  3. Before Midnight
  4. The Act of Killing
  5. A Touch of Sin
  6. Leviathan
  7. Gravity
  8. Computer Chess
  9. Frances Ha
  10. Upstream Color
  11. Museum Hours
  12. Blue Is the Warmest Color
  13. Bastards
  14. Spring Breakers
  15. Like Someone in Love
  16. Stories We Tell
  17. Her
  18. Nebraska
  19. American Hustle
  20. The Grandmaster

Movie

Nebraska
11038247
RyanG

Small Movie, Big Punch

What happens when one of the staff persons charged with helping young people overcome trauma, neglect and abuse at an at-risk juvenile home is quietly suffering from her own painful past? This is the question at the center of this wonderful, little film propelled by strong acting performances and a deft touch at balancing grim subject matter with moments of levity and humor. Grace, played by a fantastic Brie Larson, and her devoted boyfriend Mason work together to help kids manage their feelings and cope with the cards they’ve been dealt. But her strength of character and compassionate heart alone are of little use when it comes to facing her own feelings of fear, anxiety and anger. Short Term 12 proves again that a film’s success is in no way related to the number of celebrity actors, use of CGI or amount of super hero characters. Sometimes, going small produces large rewards.

Movie

Short Term 12
11031435
RyanG

In a World...

Written and directed by actress Lake Bell, In a World… is a charming and well-structured comedy with the obscure, yet cutthroat world of Hollywood movie voice-over as a backdrop. Bell portrays a blithely underachieving vocal coach living in the substantially self-important shadow of her “king of the epic trailer voice-over” father played by the great Fred Melamed. In a World… is funny, smart, social satire that doesn’t veer into pretentiousness and marks the debut of Bell as a writer/director to watch in the future.

Movie

In a World
11040197
mykyl

In Space, No One Can Hear Sandra Bullock Lose an Oscar

Sandra Bullock may have taken on deadly space debris in Best Picture contender Gravity, but it’ll likely be Cate Blanchett that destroys her chances at winning a second Oscar come Sunday, March 2nd.  That’s right, the 86th Academy Awards ceremony is less than two weeks away, which mean now’s the time to catch up on all those critically-acclaimed movies you’ve been meaning to watch.  Thankfully, the Kalamazoo Public Library is here to help with this list of all the Oscar-nominated films that you can check out from us right now:

 Several more Oscar contenders will be available on DVD or Blu-ray very soon:

  • With 10 nominations (including Bullock’s), Gravity (available February 25th) will be a force to be reckoned with on Oscar night.  It has a great shot at winning Best Picture and Director (Alfonso Cuarón) and is also the front-runner for technical categories like Visual Effects, Sound Editing, and Sound Mixing.  The film was also recognized for Cinematography, Film Editing, Original Score, and Production Design.
  • Also out on February 25th is Nebraska, which welcomed nominations for Best Picture, Director (Alexander Payne), Actor (Bruce Dern), Supporting Actress (June Squibb), Cinematography, and Original Screenplay.

 These Oscar contenders will be available in March, and you can place a hold on them right now:

Keep an eye out for the rest of the nominees, which are sure to follow.  In the meantime, come on down to KPL and start prepping for Oscar night!

Movie

Gravity
11031491
DanHoag

Liked That, Try This (No. 1)

Reader’s Advisory is a term that librarians use to describe the act of linking similar titles together so that readers are exposed to authors and titles that possess comparable thematic or stylistic qualities. This is the first installment of a film version of that kind of process of suggestion. It’s not scientifically based and so absorb these lists with a grain of salt.

• Liked Goodfellas, try Miller’s Crossing
• Liked Charulata, try Everlasting Moments
• Liked The Truman Show, try Real Life
• Liked Drive, try Taxi Driver
• Liked Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, try Petulia
• Liked Last Year at Marienbad, try Memento
• Liked The Ice Storm, try Ordinary People
• Liked Groundhog Day, try Being There
• Liked Take Shelter, try Repulsion
• Liked Il Postino, try Amelie
• Liked E.T, try Super 8
• Liked Doubt, try The Silence
• Liked Mad Men (series), try The Hour (series)
• Liked Paper Moon, try The Last Picture Show
• Liked Harold and Maude, try Delicacy
• Liked Tinker Tailor, Soldier Spy, try The Spy Who Came in from the Cold
• Liked Goon, try Slapshot
• Liked Harry and Tonto, try Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore
• Liked The Newsroom (series), try Sports Night (series)
• Liked Platoon, try The Thin Red Line
• Liked Leaving Las Vegas, try Taste of Cherry
• Liked Dead Man Walking, try Into the Abyss: a tale of death, a tale of life
• Liked There Will Be Blood, try Citizen Kane
The Bridge Over River Kwai, try Force 10 from Navarone
• Liked Blue Valentine, try A Woman Under the Influence  

Movie

Force 10 from Navarone
10046378
RyanG

Le Havre

Le Havre is a wonderful film that I missed seeing when it first showed at WMU’s Little Theater several years ago. Named for a provincial city on the northern, French coast, the film is one of Finnish director Aki Kaurismäki’s most warmhearted and charming. Known for his less is more approach to film making, his works tend to give birth to zany, working class characters whose expressions of both joy and futility come off as droll and darkly peculiar (fans of Wes Anderson and Jim Jarmusch will appreciate the brand of humor). Le Havre is a simple story: an elderly shoe shiner stumbles into a plot to hide a young, African boy from the authorities who seek his deportation. Ex “bohemian” Marcel Marx has a difficult enough time as it is in dealing with his critically ill wife. His newest project, one that he had not expected, is to safeguard with the help of his fellow townspeople, a young refuge named Idrissa, who is seeking to travel to London. With the authorities hot on his trail, Marcel keeps ahead of the fuzz with just enough assistance from Le Havre’s band of bartenders, rock musicians, and an unlikely detective. It’s a beautiful fantasy as much as it is a political fable about community and humanity.

Movie

Le Havre
10722114
RyanG