Staff Picks: Movies

Staff-recommended viewing from the KPL catalog.

In a World...

Written and directed by actress Lake Bell, In a World… is a charming and well-structured comedy with the obscure, yet cutthroat world of Hollywood movie voice-over as a backdrop. Bell portrays a blithely underachieving vocal coach living in the substantially self-important shadow of her “king of the epic trailer voice-over” father played by the great Fred Melamed. In a World… is funny, smart, social satire that doesn’t veer into pretentiousness and marks the debut of Bell as a writer/director to watch in the future.

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In a World
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Jiro Dreams of Sushi

In an inauspicious Tokyo subway station, 85 year-old master sushi chef Jiro Ono works each day to improve his craft and humbly offer his customers a dining experience that is simple yet sublime. Jiro Dreams of Sushi tells Jiro’s remarkable story. The documentary is a meditation on work and great sushi, as well as a zen koan about the unreachability of perfection and the beauty inherent in a life spent attempting to reach it. Foodie’s will love this film, but the added storyline that develops with Jiro’s two son’s, who are both sushi chef’s themselves, will appeal to all.

Jiro Dreams Of Sushi - Trailer from curious on Vimeo.

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Jiro Dreams of Sushi
10720347
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Two from my 'to watch' list

Over the holiday I was able to catch up on some film titles from the past year that I had failed to see during the previous twelve months. In particular, I enjoyed two documentaries, Page One: inside the New York Times and Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop, that were both listed on KPL staff 2011 Best of Lists. While very different in style and content, the films relate in my opinion because the subject of each documentary seem to be, at least at some level, “in” on the project and are using the documentary format to take a position and very effectively tell the audience something about themselves. In the case of Page One, it’s the NYT convincing us that they remain relevant and the authoritative place for news in an ever splintering media landscape, and in the case of Conan O’Brien, which was filmed in the aftermath of O’Brien’s famously contentious split with NBC and Jay Leno, its O’Brien convincing us that he is an incredibly, almost compulsively, driven entertainer. Both films have compelling characters featured prominently, with Page One its NYT media and culture columnist David Carr – who, after watching this film, I think of as the Keith Richards of journalism – and with Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop it has to be O’Brien himself, he is in nearly every frame of the film and working incredibly hard to entertain everyone near him during his every waking second. I’m glad that I had the time to watch both films, and I recommend using KPL staff picks, our Movies and Music pages, and KPL staff in all our locations to help keep your “to watch” lists full of great titles.

Movie

Page One: inside the New York Times
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An Architecture of Decency

 “That is the reason you go to college, not to make more money, but to gain the knowledge to make this a better world.” – Sambo Mockee


The fantastic documentary, Citizen Architect: Samuel Mockbee and the spirit of the Rural Studio, tells the inspiring story of architect and teacher Samuel “Sambo” Mockbee and the thought provoking work of the Rural Studio, a design/build program offered through Auburn University’s School of Architecture, which Mockbee co-founded. The Rural Studio focuses all of its projects on the citizens of Hale County Alabama, one of the poorest areas of the country and that is what makes it so utterly unique and what really makes this film so fascinating. Using recycled, found, or donated materials, the Rural Studio and it’s architects in training get a very real world, hands-on experience in creating what Mockbee referred to as an “architecture of decency”. Gifting beautiful, functional, and efficient structures to people whose day to day lives are spent in pretty shocking conditions, but whose dignity and worth as human beings is clearly respected by the students and the faculty of the Rural Studio. The program and Mockbee have become an inspiration for similar design/build experiences at other universities, and this film certainly does inspire, but it is the uniquely compassionate and socially responsible vision of Mockbee, who passed away from leukemia in 2001, that really shines and will, hopefully, reverberate far into the future.

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Citizen Architect
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Best Worst Movie

This hilarious and ultimately heartwarming documentary tells the story of the people responsible for the "so bad it's good" film Troll 2 and what has happened to them as the low budget horror film they were involved with in 1989 slowly turned into what is affectionately known as “the worst movie ever made” - a cult favorite with maniacal fans and Rocky Horror Picture Show like midnight showing parties. Written and directed by Michael Stephenson – who actually starred in Troll 2 as a child – Best Worst Movie’s main focus is George Hardy, the father in Troll 2, who is now a well loved general dentist living a quiet and happy life in a small Alabama town. The film examines the Troll 2 phenomenon and follows George and many of the other cast members, several who are clearly not as well adjusted as George appears to be, as they hit the Troll 2 circuit, engaging with rabid fans and soaking up the weird fame that they have in this realm. The film is well made, touching, funny, and above all entertaining. Even if you have never seen Troll 2 you will be a fan after viewing this great documentary.

Movie

Best Worst Movie
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