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Staff Picks: Movies

From Femur to the Outer Reaches

Recent internet buzz about a leaked trailer for the newest installment of the Star Wars series and the release of Christopher Nolan’s film Interstellar (in theaters now) got me thinking about the first, great science fiction film, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. It’s a beautiful enigma of a film that continues to stand up to the test of time given its enduring philosophical and scientific themes, not to mention its visual originality and marked refusal to conform to commercial and artistic conventions. It should be noted that it was not everyone’s cup of tea when it originally opened in movie theaters in 1968 and it’s glacial pacing, minimalist dialogue and conceptual approach to narrative won’t please many of today’s film viewers but for those willing to give into its pondering lyricism and subtle jabs at satire and social commentary, you will be rewarded.


Rosewood Lane

I chose to watch Rosewood Lane because Rose McGowan was in it. I’ve like her since Charmed. Rose McGowan is Sonny Blake a radio talk show therapist. Her alcoholic dad dies, and she moves into her childhood home. They briefly touch on that she tried to sell the house and could not but the movie had to have her move back home so that we can have the paperboy terrorize her. On her first day back the paperboy asks if she wants to subscribe and there is a good deal if she subscribes in the first 30 days. I wonder what would have happened if she had said yes. She doesn’t and the paperboy shows up in her basement, moves her swan and bear figurines, peeks through the fence. It doesn’t sound too terrorizing to have your swan figurine moved to where the bear figurine was and vice versa, but it was the visual indicator that he was in her house and that she was vulnerable to him. The neighbors say he is cunning and can do things that cannot be explained. Sonny sees the paper boy holding a cardboard sign which says Hickory standing by his bicycle on the road, she drives past him and bang suddenly he is in front of her holding another sign which says Dickory and again somehow he got in front of her and he is holding a sign which says Doc. We are left wondering if he is magical, a vampire or just knows some good shortcuts. Whatever, he is good at being creepy. Things escalate; the paperboy calls her station and says nursery rhymes. Sonny is convinced that the paperboy killed her father. The movie doesn’t give any reason why the paperboy is terrorizing her, other than he is a sociopath and on his newspaper route. The Director also directed Jeepers Creepers and this movie has the same feel. The paperboy is good at terrorizing and the movie keeps you engaged. Give it a watch and if you are approached by your paperboy you might want to say yes to a subscription. Check it out at KPL.


Crazy Train

If the snowy weather’s got you down and you want to watch people who are colder than you are, or if you’re in the mood to wallow in mankind’s devastating effect on global temperatures—or if you just like a good sci-fi action movie—check out the recent South Korean (but mostly English language) release Snowpiercer. Based off the French graphic novel Le Transperceneige and co-written and directed by Bong Joon-ho, best known for the rollickingly great rampaging monster flick The Host, Snowpiercer is set in a dystopian future where mankind’s attempts to reverse global warming have expedited a new Ice Age that has killed off most life on the planet. The few humans that remain live on the Snowpiercer, a massive train that continuously circumnavigates the globe. Within the train, people are divided into social classes, with the poor living in squalor in the rearmost cars, cruelly lorded over by the wealthiest passengers from the front cars. But a revolution is brewing, as man-with-a-past Curtis (Captain America’s Chris Evans) leads the impoverished on a car-by-car battle towards the engine, with hopes of overthrowing the Snowpiercer’s creator and authoritarian leader, played by Ed Harris.

Shot with cinematic grandeur, Snowpiecer succeeds on many levels: as suspenseful fight-laden actioner; as a dystopian fable; as a commentary on our environmental malfeasance; and, as an acting showcase—Tilda Swinton’s gonzo portrayal of a ministerial henchwoman is worth the proverbial price of admission alone. So check it out—the icy backdrop and chilly social undertones may just be the belly-warming tonic you need to make it through these first few frozen weeks of the season.


Dramas with the White Stuff

Do you love snow and winter? Here are some serious dramas where winter or snow plays a significant role in the plot and setting.

Mon Oncle Antoine
Metropolitan
Fanny and Alexander
The Ascent
A Christmas Tale
My Night at Maud’s
All That Heaven Allows
Downhill Racer
Fargo
The Shining
Frozen River


About Time

Mixing Notting Hill-like romantic fantasy with time traveling tropes, About Time excoriates viewers to live life to its fullest in the most sugary of ways. The message throughout the film is crystal clear and delivered like a hammer slamming against your head and your heart--life is precious and always chockfull of peaks and valleys, therefore, even if your family has the capacity to travel backward to modify one’s choices and missteps, one should recognize and cherish the insignificant, every day moments that form one’s life. It’s a terribly obvious film with just enough melodrama and character to move the heartstrings while not embarrassing itself. What better way to spend a dreary, cold Saturday than inside with a bowl of popcorn and a movie with beautiful people romping about their romantic endeavors with time travel at their fingertips. For fans of treacly schmaltz like The Time Traveler’s Wife, Love Actually, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and The Vow.


Binge Watching ‘House of Cards’

Many of my friends have shared their enthusiasm for the series House of Cards. I had never seen an episode but knew from awards shows that it was highly acclaimed. This political season seemed like a good time to watch it.

As my husband and I have been saying to each other as we have been binge watching season #1…is there anyone to like in this show or is everyone a back-stabbing, double-crossing politician?? So far the answer is NO….there is no one to like BUT it is very compelling.

My friends tell me I will be appalled at how Frank Underwood becomes President without being elected. If we watch enough episodes tonight, maybe he will be President by the morning.

This is just one of many good series in our AV collection. I have several on my list for watching this winter.

 


Degrassi High

Degrassi High, the original, debuted on PBS in 1989, when I was seven-going-on-eight. The high school drama was a bit too old for me then, but boy, am I glad it’s out on DVD, because, as a 30-something, I love it. Its charm is multifaceted: there’s the 80’s fashion, the nostalgia for the smart-phone-free days of my youth, and actors who are actual teenagers and seem like normal kids. Although the show can seem a bit like an afterschool special, it addresses controversial topics in a way that teen programs just don’t do anymore. Kids today might not get the appeal, but I recommend  Degrassi High for any Gen-Xers who want to take a look back.

And without further ado, here’s Joey and the Zits, Degrassi’s very own rock stars:


Still Walking

The Japanese film Still Walking is a beautiful portrait of a strained but loving family whose complicated history unfolds over a single day under the specter of death and grief. While this may turn away those who seek out escapist fare in their movie-watching experience, the film avoids the trappings of being too grim. With its un-rushed lyricism and thoughtful pacing, the wonderful dialogue unpacks our characters’ anger, regret and nostalgic yearning for what could have been and what never will be. The film never feels preachy or heavy handed. It simply explores how each family member deals with loss and conflict, often through aloof and insensitive ways that only deepen long-standing wounds. Catharsis is depicted as problematic, messy and much more difficult to bring about than any self-help manual would suggest. The message here is that Hollywood endings have no place in the real world and that’s what you’re going to get with this highly personal work from Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda. Set in a hilly, coastal town, the Yokoyama family meets each year to remember their son and brother who died in a drowning accident some 15 years before. It’s an opportunity to eat (and eat they do), catch up on gossip, visit the grave and introduce the parents to new family members. Fathers and sons will spar over legacies, husbands and wives will recall past infidelities, and a young boy will begin to understand his own heartache within a broader context. Fans of films like Tokyo Story and Yi Yi will enjoy Still Walking’s intelligent slice of life approach to exploring the dynamics of family drama.


Palo Alto

Palo Alto is based on the book Palo Alto: stories by James Franco. The stories are based on James Franco's high school days. Basically a story of kids in high school defining who they are, dealing with issues that come up in high school; drinking, drugs, girls. Jack Kilmer son of Val Kilmer is the star. It is his first movie and he kind a looks like Val Kilmer just a little especially in the face. Val Kilmer's is also in the movie as the stepdad of Emma Roberts who is the other major lead. You can tell it's a low-budget film but it's entertaining and really talks to the raw emotions of highschooler's.
The main theme for this is that April (Emma Roberts) has a crush on her soccer coach James Franco. Teddy (Jack Kilmer) and his buddy Fred do things together, smoke weed. go to parties. Teddy has a crush on April. Now one thing I did notice in this movie is the lack of parental supervision. Not until Teddy gets in trouble and has to go to court do you see the mom. Other than that you don't see a lot of the parents, mostly if you do see them it's the kid saying “Hey I'm going out”. That's just my view was as a parent.
Come on down to KPL and check it out.

 


A Late Bergman Tour de Force

Autumn Sonata (1978) is a masterful portrait of the kind of personal conflict embedded within family relationships fraught with regret, shame and disappointment. The great actress Ingrid Bergman (who only worked with Ingmar Bergman once) puts in a fantastic performance as the aging classical pianist who tries to reconnect with her two adult daughters, both of whom she has emotionally neglected over the years in pursuit of her career. Racked with guilt, Bergman clumsily attempts to express her deep feelings of regret and love for her eldest daughter (played by the great Liv Ullman) over the course of a long awaited visit. A brilliant a depiction of the corrosive discord between a parent and child, Autumn Sonata’s evocative power revealed that Bergman was still a master at the melodrama by excavating both he and Ingrid’s personal challenges with mediating family, love, art and career.