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Staff Picks: Movies

A Long Way Down

A Long Way Down is about four people who on New Years Eve all try to commit suicide by jumping off a very tall building. They of course do not (or it would be a very short movie). I found it interesting that this tall building had razor wire and sharp pointing things around its edges to discourage jumping. Martin (Pierce Bronson) brought a ladder to lay across the wire and enable him to get out far enough to jump. Maureen (Toni Collette) shows up and asks if she could wait and tells him it was a good idea to bring a ladder she had not thought of it. This gives you an idea of the quirky nature of this movie. Then Jess (Imogen Poots) shows up and makes a run for the edge, she is stopped by Martin and Maureen. While these three are skirmishing about we meet J.J. (Aron Paul), who is a Pizza Delivery boy, also on top of the building trying to jump. Everyone leaves, fate and lots of rain bring them together again. They make a pack to not jump until Valentines day. They bond and we learn more about each one and why they were on top of the building.
Come on down to KPL and check it out.


The Little Guitar in Movies

After watching one of the last episodes of the sitcom How I Met Your Mother, in which one of the characters performs a poignant rendition of the classic ballad La Vie En Rose with a Ukulele, I began thinking about the cinematic role of this Hawaiian instrument (one of my favorites). Several recent films came immediately to mind (Her and Blue Valentine) but after a Youtube search, I discovered a few others films that feature this little guitar’s power to pluck an audience’s heartstrings. For fans of the instrument, check out Pearl Jam vocalist Eddie Vedder’s album Ukulele Songs.

From the movie Her

A compilation of movie scenes: 

 


You Ransom, You Lose Some

Life of Crime is not an official prequel to Quentin Tarantino’s Jackie Brown, but it’s okay to pretend it is. Both films are based on Elmore Leonard books (The Switch and Rum Punch, respectively) and feature two of the crime novelist’s recurring characters, ex-cons and criminal cohorts Ordell Robbie and Louis Gara. Mos Def and John Hawkes take over these roles—originally played by Samuel L. Jackson and Robert De Niro in Jackie Brown—and give you a glimpse at the earlier days of their illegal antics.

Set in Detroit in the late 1970s, Life of Crime follows Ordell and Louis as they hatch an ill-fated plan to extort money from corrupt real-estate developer Frank Dawson (Tim Robbins) by kidnapping his wife, Mickey (Jennifer Aniston), while he’s away on business. Unfortunately for the kidnappers—and for Mickey—Frank is actually off in Florida with his mistress (Isla Fisher), and when he hears that his wife is in mortal peril if he doesn’t pony up a million dollar ransom, Frank sees this as an opportunity to escape what was a failing marriage without having to face a costly divorce and steep alimony payments. Things are further complicated as Frank’s mistress hijacks the hostage negotiations, the white supremacist-slash-gun nut harboring Mickey grows dangerously unstable, and Louis begins to develop feelings for Mickey even though he may be forced to kill her.

Directed by Daniel Schechter and co-starring Will Forte and Mark Boone, Jr., Life of Crime deftly captures the pulpy crime and oddball humor of the best Leonard adaptations and would make for a great double feature with Tarantino’s masterpiece, even if the two are related only in spirit.

 


Thunderstruck

Thunderstruck is Freaky Friday for basketball. This is a Disney like movie. A high school student loves basketball but sucks at it. He has the classic sister who video tapes him and the classic high school bully who posts the videos on the cafeteria monitor. A side note, this really shows how times have changed and not changed. Growing up we did not have a TV in the cafeteria, heck computers were not even invented, but we did have cafeteria humiliation. This is the same and is timeless. Make fun of the nerd, Jocks rule. Once that is set, we see Brian at a Thunderstruck basketball game and he gets picked to throw a half court basket which could win him $20,000. He, of course does not make the shot, and instead hits the mascot, thus making it more humorous. But by being selected to throw the ball Kevin Durant signs a basketball for Brian. When exchanging the basketball Brian wishes he had Kevin’s talent and Kevin wished Brian did have his talent, a sparkle appears and we witness magic occurring. Brian now has Kevin’s talent. Brian tries out for the high school team and becomes the star. Kevin loses his talent and becomes the joke of basketball talk shows. We see the classic, Brian rises in high school fame, gets the hot girl, dumps his childhood friend. The girl tells him she liked him pre basketball stardom and that he has changed. Brian sees the light, gives back the talent and becomes the good guy on the high school basketball team. I goggled Kevin Durant and he is a bona fide basketball star playing small forward for the Oklahoma Thunder basketball team. Considering he was 9 foot something ( a slight bit of exaggeration) I had an inkling he was a real basketball player, not sure why he is a “small” forward. How big do you have to be to be a big forward? The message of the movie is hard work gets you where you want to go. This is my message: magic will get you there sooner Enjoy the movie and keep looking for the magic. Come on down to KPL and check it out.


The Reconsidered Film

Sometimes a film just does not hit you in that sweet spot the first time around. You leave the theater disappointed or mulling over what could have been. Maybe it was you all along, your mood, your unwillingness to open up and let the film work its magic. I’ve hated films that I later came to love and respect after my initial dismissal. There are those films that grow on you and seem to get better with multiple viewings. The first time I saw Frances Ha, I moaned about its obvious influences and reference points (Godard, Truffault). The protagonist’s personality was a bit grating and I just couldn’t give in to the film’s cloying repackaging of the classics of the 60’s and 70’s it so self-consciously aped. It simply felt derivative, the kind of film where its style devours its substance. I recently gave it a second chance and have subsequently modified my early misgivings. I think the elements of the film I enjoyed the most were the editing and the choice to convert the digital footage into black and white. It’s quite the looker. Now there are a lot of movies not worth a first viewing let alone a second but sometimes there comes a long a film that deserves a reconsideration.


Bee Sting

In Jason Bateman’s directorial debut, Bad Words, a prickly forty-something with a long-festering grudge named Guy inserts himself into a national spelling bee for children by taking advantage of a loophole in the rules that simply stipulate that entrants must not have graduated from the eighth grade.  Having dropped out of middle-school (and accompanied by a scrappy journalist ready to spread negative publicity at the drop of a hat), Guy meets with begrudging official compliance that quickly erupts into a national controversy surrounding his participation.  It doesn’t help that Guy gleefully exerts dominance over his otherwise bright and intelligent kid competitors whom he eviscerates through intimidation, manipulation, fear, and his own grown-up word power.  Guy’s motives for competing against children in a nationally televised spelling bee are kept a mystery until near the end of the film, but suffice it to say, he’s an angry man looking for revenge.  Along his path of destruction, Guy develops an unlikely friendship with an overly earnest 10-year-old named Chaitanya, who proves to be quick study in the ways of profanity, reckless behavior, and ultimately, stubbornness.


Bad Words is a pleasantly vulgar, pitch-black comedy that avoids the usual tidy-bow happy-ending clichés found in most Hollywood comedies.  Guy is unabashedly unpleasant and his slightly paternal relationship with Chaitanya never gets cloying.  It’s worth checking out if you like your humor dark and inappropriate.  The talented cast includes Kathryn Hahn, Philip Baker Hall, and Allison Janney.


Run & Jump

I don’t tend to gravitate toward watching romantic comedies because they’re often disposed to possess the worst elements and doses of sentimentality, cliché, bathos, and stereotype. That’s not to say that in the proper hands, these qualities cannot be reasonably constrained so as to reduce the number of times I consider hitting the eject button. Having said that, I decided to watch a small film from Ireland called Run & Jump (a title that is a metaphor for loosening up and living life more freely I suppose). It hits most of its notes most of the time and we can probably attribute this to the fact that Hollywood didn’t have its hands all over the writing, casting or plot. There’s only one recognizable actor here and that’s former SNL star Will Forte. There’s plenty of Irish quirkiness (see: stereotype) but it’s finely regulated so as not to delve into caricature. The film centers on a stressed out family coping with the changes to their home life after the father suffers a stroke, leaving him with cognitive and physical disabilities. Forte plays a doctor living with the family and studying the father’s recuperation. A triangular relationship begins to form as Forte and the wife begin to bond, messing up an already chaotic domestic situation. It’s not all dour melodrama as there are plenty of moments of humor sprinkled about this well-crafted film.


Cannes Film Festival Winners

This year’s Cannes Film Festival winners included Winter Sleep (Best Film), Bennett Miller (Best Director), Julianne Moore (Best Actress) and Timothy Spall (Best Actor). Here’s a look back at some of the films that have previously been awarded the prestigious Palme d’or. 
 
Black Orpheus—1959
The Leopard—1963
Paris, Texas—1984
Blowup—1967
The Conversation—1974
Pulp Fiction—1994
Taste of Cherry—1997
Missing—1982
The White Ribbon—2009
Taxi Driver—1976

Movie

Black Orpheus
10437912

 


Jarmusch's Independent Vision

Jim Jarmusch’s films are not for everyone. They are, however, incredibly influential and important in the history of American cinema. Slowly paced with quirky characters, his droll, often minimalist films explore the ironic and humanistic with equal attention. His films feel very American (the America on the margins that is) while at the same time, they are populated with Italian cabdrivers (Night on Earth), teenage Japanese tourists obsessed with early rock and roll (Mystery Train), and Hungarian immigrants (Stranger Than Paradise). His most accessible and mainstream movie to date is Broken Flowers, due in large part because of Bill Murray’s great performance as a romantically failed, wealthy introvert who wears retro sweat suits while sitting in the dark (during the day), watching television. It’s only when he receives a mysterious letter from one of his ex-girlfriends, suggesting that he has a son he never knew about, does he set out on a personal journey toward…well, maybe nothing and maybe everything. The moments within a journey are what fascinate Jarmusch about the human condition rather than a tightly sewn conclusion to a story. His cult classics Down by Law and Stranger Than Paradise cemented his reputation as an indie sweetheart with a wry sensibility and skill for reimagining genre and form by the early 1990’s. The release of his newest film (Only Lovers Left Alive) will once again shine the light on one of America’s most idiosyncratic, independent filmmakers.

Movie

Broken Flowers
10106712

Without a Sound

Most of us prefer sound with our visual imagery when it comes to movie watching. However, if you’re looking to challenge yourself to experience visual poetry and storytelling in new ways without the element of music or dialogue, here’s a quick introductory sampler of well-regarded works.

The Artist
Vampyr
Battleship Potemkin
People on Sunday
The General
The Dictator
Le Quattro Volte (sound, but no dialogue)
The Passion of Joan of Arc
City Lights
Metropolis
Sunrise

Movie

People on sunday
10487209