Local History and Genealogy

News, comments, resources, and more.

Images of the Civil War

One of the great things about KPL is that its collections are so vast, varied, and sometimes surprising. Our 107-year-old government documents collection yields some of the best surprises. A few years ago, we cataloged one of the real gems of the documents collection - the entire 128 volumes of The War of the Rebellion: A compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. This fully indexed set contains reports, correspondence, orders, etc. for all military operations of both the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. You wouldn’t think that could be beat, but the documents collection yielded something even more fascinating – the Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. It doesn’t look like much on the outside, but wait until you see all the images inside. There are maps of battles, diagrams of forts, images of war-damaged buildings; as well as uniforms, weapons, wagons, boats and trains. The atlas provides a total visual history of the Civil War. 

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 Check out the Flickr gallery of selected images from the Atlas!

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Rebel lines near Atlanta
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http://www.catalog.kpl.gov/uhtbin/cgisirsi/x/0/0/5?searchdata1=atlas+to+accompany+the+official+records+AND+united+states{AU}&library=BRANCHES&language=ANY&format=ANY&item_type=ANY&location=ANY&match_on=KEYWORD&item_1cat=ANY&item_2cat=ANY&sort_by=-PBYR

 

Beth T

The New History Room

If you haven’t been to the history room recently, come by for a visit! You’ll notice something different as soon as you get to the second floor when you see our beautiful new entrance. But that’s just the beginning. The local history room has gone through a lot of changes over the last few months. From time to time we were noisy, a little dusty, and sometimes even closed; but the disruption has really paid off! We now have twice as much space, and everything we need to help with local history and genealogy research is easily accessible. Improvements to the history room include:

• Special collections conveniently separated for easy access, including: genealogy; city directories and phonebooks; maps and atlases; and yearbooks.
Microfilm, microfilm reader/printers, and hard copies of Kalamazoo Gazettes housed within the history room.
• Print station is now located next to the computers.
• Shelves have more room, making books easier to find and giving us room to grow!

Enjoy a few photos of the new history room and then come in and see it for yourself.

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History room entry
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http://www.kpl.gov/local-history/room.aspx 

 

Beth T

Things are happening!

The Local History Room has had to close up for a couple of days while we get organized into our expanded space. Things are quite a mess right now, but soon we’ll be enjoying more room and a great new layout.

Our collection isn’t accessible at the moment, but don’t forget that all the genealogy databases can be accessed from any of the computers in the Central Library and the branches, and there are many wonderful local history and genealogy books available in the circulating collection.

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History Room Renovation
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/renovation/
Beth T

See Our Community Calendar

Welcome to the KPL Local History Community Calendar! Join us in investigating widely diverse Historical subjects presented by local historical societies, organizations, collectors, and preservationist groups. We list conferences, tours, meetings, special events, and large Southwest Michigan antique markets and extend our invitation to anyone interested in history to visit the Community Calendar on the KPL Local History Website. Scheduling an event or program of local historical nature? Complete an information form, or call 269.553.7843, and we will be happy to list your event on our calendar.

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Local History Community Events
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http://www.kpl.gov/local-history/community-events/
TamaraS

Green Dots in Local History Collection

We have recently updated Our Local History Reference Collection with green dot stickers on books that have circulating copies. This means that any title in Local History with a green dot sticker has a duplicate that can be checked out. Patrons may simply look up the title in our catalogue or ask the Local History Reference person to find the location of the circulating copy. Patrons are welcome to put the title on reserve if it is checked out or only available in a branch library.

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Green Dot Poster
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http://kzpl.ent.sirsi.net/client/KPL
TamaraS

A Gem for Irish Research

We are very fortunate to be able to continually add new books to the history room collection. They include items on local and regional history, Michigan history, and genealogy research techniques and materials. I enjoy searching for these items and perusing them when they are ready for shelving in the local history room. Occasionally a new book will really jump out at me and I will find myself totally absorbed. This happened with our newest addition to the collection for Irish genealogy research, Atlas of the Great Irish Famine by John Crowley. This big, beautiful book is full of gorgeous photographs and artwork related to Ireland; but its greatest feature is the dozens of maps detailing every aspect of population change, workhouse locations, housing types, employment, cemeteries, soup kitchens, migration… you name it, there’s a map that explains it. However, it isn’t just dry maps and figures. The impact on society is conveyed through written and oral accounts of the time, art, poetry, and in depth analysis. At over eight pounds and 700 pages, this reference book was not designed for cozy, cover-to-cover reading. But once you open it, you’ll find yourself wanting to go back to explore it again and again.

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Atlas of the Great Irish Famine
9780814771488
Beth T

A Win-Win for Genealogists

For those of us who have caught the genealogy bug, there’s no need for further inducement to trace and record our family history. We know the thrill and challenge of genealogical research is addicting all by itself. However, if you need evidence to help justify your obsession with census data and tombstone transcriptions to those yet to be infected, I have just the thing. A new book by Bruce Feiler, The Secrets of Happy Families, reports that it is highly beneficial for children to know about their family history. Feiler shares some amazing conclusions drawn from a study conducted by Robyn Fivush and Marshall Duke, professors of psychology at Emory University. Feiler summarizes, “The more children knew about their family’s history, the stronger their sense of control over their lives, the higher their self-esteem, and the more successfully they believed their families functioned.”

Of course, sharing family stories with your children or grandchildren is a great way to teach them your family history. But if you’d like to take it a step further, here are a couple books to get you started. Climbing Your Family Tree: Online and Off-line Genealogy for Kids by Ira Wolfman and Roots for Kids: A Genealogy Guide for Young People by Susan Provost Beller both present a kid-friendly introduction to genealogy. So now you can share your passion for family history AND help the next generation become happy, confident people.

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The secrets of happy families
9780061778735
Beth T

Browse Our Collection - Online

One of the best parts of working in the history room is getting to know the collection and all of the wonderful items in it. There’s only one problem. Sadly, people just don’t come in and say “Hey, show me something really cool,” so some of my favorite things don’t get as much attention as I feel they deserve. However, that’s all about to change. We are now making selected items completely accessible through our website, and will be scouring the history room for great things to share in the coming months.

Our first offering is a catalog from the Henderson-Ames Company of Kalamazoo that dates back about 100 years. It contains products exclusively for the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Henderson-Ames boldly claimed, “We are ready to show any Lodge, that the great values which have made us the leaders for many years in the manufacture of Odd Fellow Regalia, Costumes, etc., are increased in this the most complete catalog ever published.” There’s no way to know if their assertion was correct, but with 134 pages of everything from false beards to grave markers, they couldn’t have been far off. Enjoy flipping through the catalog, and be sure to check out the large color images of costumes that begin on page 71.

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IOOF catalog
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http://kzpl.ent.sirsi.net/client/KPL/search/results?qu=Degree+Staff+costumes%2C+regalia%2C+paraphernalia%2C+books%2C+blanks+and+supplies+for+Odd+Fellow+Lodges+%3A+net+catalogue+number+five&te=&lm=ALLLIBS 
Beth T

A Trip Down Memory Lane

The Library is 140 years old! Part of our recent celebration included collecting and displaying photos of the library over the years. It was so fun to see the pictures of former staff, earlier buildings, long obsolete equipment, branch libraries, promotions, and library patrons from years ago. The collection spans from the first library building, which was completed in 1893, all the way into the 1990s. The photos were displayed at the Central library, but they are so great we wanted to make them available permanently through the website.

Enjoy this gallery and let us know if it brings back memories.

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Kalamazoo Public Library, 1920s
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/kalamazoopubliclibrary/sets/72157631806487811/
Beth T

McConnell Photograph Collection

It happens to many of us – a distant relative by marriage or a close family friend passes away. They had no children, and someone delivers a box of old photos to you because there is no one else to take them. You don’t know who any of the people in the photos are and you’re quite sure none of them are related to you. So what do you do with them? Well, you might consider donating them to the library located in the city where most of the photos were taken.

We are very fortunate that thoughtful people have done that very thing from time to time here at KPL, and recently the photo collection of Marion Louise McConnell came to us that way. It is an incredible collection of over 100 photos from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Many are portraits taken by Kalamazoo photographers. Unfortunately, very few are identified, but the collection is too good not to share. We have created a Flickr collection and will be updating it with information regarding the photographers and any other clues we can determine. Enjoy the slideshow, and if you recognize any of the people or places please leave a comment on the photo. Families that may be included in the collection are McConnell, Rineveld, Kelder, Born, and Link.

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Marion Louise McConnell
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/kalamazoopubliclibrary/sets/72157631096317746/
Beth T