From the Director

Access to eBooks

Our circulation of ebooks continues to grow but patrons often ask why we don’t have a specific new, popular title or why more copies of a title aren’t available. Unfortunately, the major publishers have been slow to make their ebook titles available to public libraries.

None of the six largest publishers sell or license ebooks to public libraries in the same way they do print editions. Three major publishers have pricing policies that make ebooks more expensive than print editions and others still refuse to make ebooks available to all libraries and are only now piloting programs that make them available to only select libraries.

The example of a recent bestseller makes the point: print edition cost to a public library: $15.51. Ebook cost on Amazon to an individual: $9.99. Ebook cost to a library from the publisher: $84.

The relationship between publishers and libraries is changing. Many small, independent publishers are willing to work with libraries; the major publishers have not yet adopted policies that address equitable access and fair pricing.

Oversight is needed to ensure that publishers do not inhibit access to ebooks in public libraries. The library community is urging policymakers to guarantee that all libraries and their constituents have unrestricted and equal access to ebooks at a fair and reasonable price.

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eBooks
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Access to eBooks

(Libraries, News, Books, Reading, National Media, Audiovisual) Permanent link

Our circulation of ebooks continues to grow but patrons often ask why we don’t have a specific new, popular title or why more copies of a title aren’t available. Unfortunately, the major publishers have been slow to make their ebook titles available to public libraries.

None of the six largest publishers sell or license ebooks to public libraries in the same way they do print editions. Three major publishers have pricing policies that make ebooks more expensive than print editions and others still refuse to make ebooks available to all libraries and are only now piloting programs that make them available to only select libraries.

The example of a recent bestseller makes the point: print edition cost to a public library: $15.51. Ebook cost on Amazon to an individual: $9.99. Ebook cost to a library from the publisher: $84.

The relationship between publishers and libraries is changing. Many small, independent publishers are willing to work with libraries; the major publishers have not yet adopted policies that address equitable access and fair pricing.

Oversight is needed to ensure that publishers do not inhibit access to ebooks in public libraries. The library community is urging policymakers to guarantee that all libraries and their constituents have unrestricted and equal access to ebooks at a fair and reasonable price.

Book

eBooks
e-reader-image-160
/ebooks/

Posted by Ann Rohrbaugh at 05/28/2013 08:10:13 AM | 


This is disgusting. The major publishers have SEEN the music industry go down in flames by refusing to acknowledge new technology, yet they are determined to go down the same path. Maybe they think they have to make one last grab for cash before everyone realizes they are no longer relevant.
On a positive note, their loss is the small publisher's gain. Hopefully more people will discover lesser known but equally talented authors through ebooks!
Posted by: Scott Wilcox ( Email ) at 5/31/2013 2:09 AM


I enjoy this Library, I've been there more then a few times and every time I go I meet new people. Thank you KPL for making it easy to get what I need for entertainment!!!
Posted by: Kelvin ( Email ) at 6/13/2013 9:03 AM


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