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Staff Picks: Books

Poverty can't be Solved and other Myths

Philosopher Peter Singer makes a compassionate, practical and moral case that we all should be giving more to end extreme poverty - the 1/3 of people living on 2 dollars/day. But first we have to get past the myths, barriers, and excuses that we tell ourselves.

Poverty can’t be Solved 

Wrong. 28 billion would do the trick (that’s the cost of education, sanitation, and healthcare for all according to the book and the website). To put that into perspective, if all Americans gave 3 dollars—that’s a billion already. Skip the latte tomorrow—there’s another 4 dollars you could donate. Moreover, the annual income of the richest 100 people could end poverty four times over. Finally, if the richest nations of the world gave 1 percent of their income—that would end poverty too.

We Need to Fix the Deeper Issues First

Yes, that’s correct. The organizations that fight extreme global poverty (like Oxfam) agree. They fix the deeper issues. They are not dropping bags of money from airplanes.

Charities Take Your Money 

Instead of helping poor people, your money goes to “administrative” purposes instead, right? Wrong. Not if you pick good charities. This book shows you how.

Government Should Do It

Government’s clearly don’t give enough to solve the problem, and America is actually near the bottom of the list in terms of percentage of national income, as opposed to gross amount. In 2006 we gave only .18% for example. Governments could give more, and so could we.

I Give Locally

That’s great, but 1/3 of the world lives in extreme poverty. Can you imagine living on less than 2 dollars a day? It’s all about perspective. This is not the Ice Bucket Challenge here (no disrespect; that was a great and successful campaign). But children are dying on a daily basis from routine, preventable diseases. The people that live in the United States, generally speaking, are much better off.

I Need to Save for my Future

Young people (including me) are especially guilty of this. The truth, of course, is that you can invest in many things.

 


Learn Something New Every Day

Learn something new every day? This isn't a new concept for librarians, for whom daily enrichment goes along with the profession. But, this book presents a unique way to acquire new ideas. Subtitled '365 Facts to Fulfill Your Life,' author Malesky presents a half-page (sometimes even shorter) anecdote or story about some little-known event or concept for each day of the year. Classed in the 031 category, this book isn't really history, science, or the arts, or any one discipline, but all of the above and then some. When I checked the entry for my birthday, I found 'The Land of Fire,' in which the author talks about Tierra del Fuego, a region which today is divided between Argentina and Chile. Anyone wanting to experience a potluck of random ideas presented in an entertaining manner should check out this quirky volume.


Separated @ birth : a true love story of twin sisters reunited

This book was sooooo up my alley! Separated @ birth is about Anaïs and Sam, two young Korean women adopted and raised in France and New Jersey, respectively. Both have adoption papers from South Korea listing them as single births, so they never had any reason to think they were anything but. Until Anaïs’s friend finds a picture of actress Sam online, and the resemblance cannot be denied. Using social media such as Twitter and Facebook, the two young women with identical birthdates get in touch with each other…then they plan a Skype session, which both are nervous yet eager for. Check out the book to find out how their story continues! If you like this book, you may also like Identical strangers: memoir of twins separated and reunited (which I blogged about a couple years ago).

 


It’s Okay to Read

Children’s author/illustrator Todd Parr will be the guest speaker at the 37th Mary Calletto Rife Youth Literature Seminar this year. Parr is the author of many wonderful children’s titles; his whimsical artwork is distinctive, and always makes me smile. His books have positive, reassuring messages about diversity, self-confidence, and acceptance. One of my favorites is It’s Okay to Be Different.

There is a Meet the Author event on Thursday, Nov. 13 at 6:30 pm at the Central Library, for all ages (free event, open to the public). The Youth Literature Seminar is Friday, Nov. 14 at KVCC’s Texas Township Campus, from 9 am - 3:30 pm (registration and fee required). Please check the KPL website for more information.

It's Okay to Read


I Love You Just Enough

On the last day of school, Heather is looking forward to a summer helping her dad on their Hazel Ridge Farm. While pulling weeds in a field, she discovers a fuzzy, helpless, and frightened baby duckling, who somehow was separated from its family.

Heather wants to help the duckling by keeping it warm and well fed. Her dad tells her that “...the hardest thing that you will have to do is not to love him too much”. After explaining these words to his daughter, she replies that “ I think I can love him just enough”.

She calls her young charge Mr. Peet due to his “peet, peet, peet” vocalizations, and puts the little wood duck into an empty fish tank with a towel, heat lamp, and a screen cover. She then begins a daily ritual of scooping up dragonfly larvae, crayfish and other little pond dwellers which she feeds to him. Mr. Peet grows and begins to explore the house and the farm, and in time teaches himself how to fly.

Summer ends and Heather returns to her friends at school, while Mr. Peet finds friends of his own. The now grown duck comes to visit less often and Heather misses him greatly, but tearfully announces that he will be okay, “...because I loved him just enough”.

This book was written by Robbyn van Frankenhuyzen, and beautifully illustrated by her husband Gijsbert, (aka Nick), both of whom actually still live at Hazel Ridge Farm in Michigan. This narrative is a true account of the wild duck fostering experiences of one of their two daughters in the 1980’s. Through this and other stories, (many of which are in the KPL collection), they relate the adventures of wildlife rehabilitation and how they have cared for many injured and orphaned animals over the years.

I Love You Just Enough is a gratifying picture book that is just right for sharing with your children as the leaves turn to their fall colors.

Also, you can visit Hazel Ridge Farm online at www.hazelridgefarm.com.


Stories without words

My kindergartener and I recently developed a love for wordless stories. In these books, the plot is driven by the pictures and you and/or your child describe what is happening as you turn the pages. KPL has a lot of these...you can find them in our catalog using the subject heading Stories without words. Some absolute FAVORITES are Journey and Quest, part of a trilogy by Aaron Becker. Journey (a Caldecott Honor Book) begins the trilogy with a bored little girl in a big city who draws a door on her wall and is transported to a magical land and kingdom. Quest continues the trilogy as the girl teams up with a boy she met in Journey, showing in great detail the adventures they have rescuing the king whose peaceful land has been overtaken by evildoers. You can read here how Aaron Becker uses 3D modeling to help build the kingdom, and then fills in the details. His work is so detailed that each time we read the story, we discover new things that we missed all the previous readings (and there are many)! The third one in this series can't come soon enough! We also love author/illustrator Gaëtan Dorémus, especially Coyote Run. Some other authors to note in this genre are Beatrice Rodriguez (Fox and Hen trilogy) and Arthur Geisert (Ice and The giant seed).

 


Oddball Michigan

The subtitle of Oddball Michigan is A Guide to 450 Really Strange Places. I take issue with the contention that the 450 attractions covered are 'really strange,' although I must say the Kalamazoo-area ones would probably qualify. I immediately turned to the local section and found the sites where Elvis was supposedly seen -- years after his death. The other Kalamazoo venue is the Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport, listed because it was on this facility's parking lot that comedian Tim Allen was arrested by the Michigan State Police for trying to sell 1.4 pounds of cocaine. Among the other West Michigan sites included are the musical fountain in Grand Haven, Bear Cave in Buchanan, and the WZZM-TV Weatherball in Grand Rapids. For locations that open and close, further information is given -- phone, hours, cost, website, and directions.

 


Tibetan Peach Pie

It is hard to believe that the iconic counter-culture writer Tom Robbins is now an octogenarian. Yet reading his rollicking new memoir, Tibetan Peach Pie, leaves little doubt that it has been a suitably wild and unconventional 82 years. Fans of Robbins, a writer who can eke out more sheer fun and joy in a single sentence than many writers can manage in their whole career, this is a must read. For those unfamiliar with Robbins, it’s never too late to love this guy, but I might suggest that you start with some of his better known novels - Still Life with Woodpecker, Jitterbug Perfume, Even Cowgirls get the Blues, etc. – and then circle back to get the full story on Robbins.


Winger

Last time I wrote about author Andrew Smith, it was to rave about how great his book Grasshopper Jungle was. Well, I'm here to tell you that his follow-up, Winger, is just as good, if not better. Winger is set in a boarding school and follows the misadventures of fourteen year-old Ryan Dean West. Our hero Ryan is a perfectly realized teen dork, all hormones and insecurity, and like Austin, the protagonist of Grasshopper Jungle, Ryan Dean has only a few things on his mind: in this case, sex, rugby, and avoiding trouble .

I'll say right now: this book destroyed me. I've yet to read another author who so completely, utterly understands what being a teenaged boy is actually like. The raging hormones? The desire for acceptance? The confusion, the attitude, the joy? It's all there, so perfectly realized. That would be enough, but then there's the other half of the book, the part that really hits hard. Suffice to say, Mr. Smith does not pull any literary punches. Where other YA authors might have softened the blow, Winger maintains an unfortunate degree of realism in how it depicts violence and also in the reactions of the main characters to that violence. Also like Grasshopper Jungle, this is not a book for everyone unless you enjoy copious swearing, raging teen boy hormones, drinking, fighting, and cartoons. But it's a book everyone should read, if only for a perfect glimpse into the mind of this 14 year-old boy.


My Teacher is a Monster!

Peter Brown authors and illustrates some of the funniest picture books around! His new title this fall is called My Teacher is a Monster! (No, I Am Not.) In the book, Bobby is frustrated with a mildly strict teacher who asks him to "settle down" in class. One day he goes to the park to forget his troubles and his monster of a teacher is sitting on a bench near his favorite spot! This event changes everything and suddenly it seems to Bobby and to Ms. Kirby that everyone one of us can be a monster sometimes.