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Just ONEthing - Mar 2015

Earlier this month, we explored Donor Retention with Michelle Karpinski (Pretty Lake Camp). During this workshop, we learned about donor-centered recognition.

According to research by Penelope Burk, the essential components of donor-centered recognition include:

  • Prompt, meaningful gift acknowledgement
  • Ability to designate the gift to a program, service or project more narrow in scope than the charity’s overall mandate
  • Measureable results report on the last gift before being asked for another gift

If all three of these essentials are present, donors report that

  • 93% would give again
  • 64% would make larger gifts
  • 74% would continue indefinitely if the essentials continued 

The bottom line was to not over-think the effort but to keep the donor relationship front-and-center while doing the essentials well: timely, genuine, and accurate.


On being prepared

It was late, and the airport shuttle had just delivered my parents, brother and I to the far reaches of remote parking. Tired and hungry, we lugged our bags over to my old van. I put the key in the lock and – snap! – the key broke in the lock. The worn faces turned to me with eyes wide and mouths open. What were we going to do?

I simply pulled my spare key from my wallet. We entered the van and went home.

Three years prior to this incident, I had been a passenger when our driver had the same problem – key broke in the lock. He had an extra key in his wallet, and the problem was easily solved. His example helped me prepare for my family’s little emergency.

Emergencies happen – we know this. We just don’t know when, nor do we know the common possibilities. A little planning may not only save us some time and inconvenience, it may save our organization.

Protecting our organizations protects the clients, staff, board, and community that depend upon them. So we offer Emergency Action Planning every year to encourage and equip you with the tools and information you need to be prepared. Our next session is Wednesday, February 25.

For more information, visit Ready.gov

Best,

Thom


Twitter Time at ONEplace

In the spirit of practice what you teach, we’ve taken a deliberate, strategic approach to Twitter. We carefully considered several questions, including:

 

  • What are the benefits of using Twitter relative to other social media platforms?
  • What presence do we want to establish?
  • What’s the best balance of original tweets, retweets, and promotional tweets?
  • Who do we want to follow…and why?

 

Over the past several weeks, we’ve documented our experience online as well as off, and examined how to use Twitter as a metric for larger program goals, and how adding this effort affects our workload and schedules.

We’ve learned a lot. Lolita has been driving the effort and she presents her research, cases from local organizations, experience, and insights in Twitter Time for Kzoo Nonprofits on February 10.

We invite you to attend to learn, share, and see how Twitter may fit into your personal or organizational communications efforts.


Just ONEthing - Feb 2015

In January, several viewed a video by Kerri Karvetsky (Company K Media) on how to Find Your Audience on Social Media

Focusing primarily on Facebook and Twitter, Kerri identified various ways to locate and analyze followers as well as several tools (many free) to help get the most from your social media presence.

She presented several points from the recent Pew Research Internet Project report. Again, focusing on Facebook and Twitter, she highlighted a few important trends.

 

  • Facebook is leveling while other platforms are still growing.
  • Facebook is still highest use, and it’s graying – fastest growing group is 65+ while 30-49 group use is declining
  • Twitter is growing in all age groups, especially in ages 18-29 and 30-49
  • Overall Twitter tends to skews younger and more urban

 

For more information from the report, visit the Pew Research Internet Project website.


Let your efforts be known

Are you one of the many area residents who engage unique, innovative, even wild efforts making Kalamazoo a great place live and work? We believe you need a forum to be heard, so we’re launching Kalamazoo Connect.

Kalamazoo Public Library and ONEplace unite to spotlight dynamic community building efforts in Greater Kalamazoo. Each quarter, Kalamazoo Connect features three short presentations on innovative, engaging endeavors followed by an opportunity for informal discussions and networking. Locally-sourced refreshments will be served following the presentations.

Interested? Your presentation will be given in a TED-talk style – open-stage speaking with optional use of notecards. Your presentation must be a minimum of 5 minutes and cannot exceed 10 minutes. You may use audio-visuals if you wish. (For examples, visit www.ted.com.)

Here’s how you can tell Kalamazoo about your innovative, community building efforts.

1. Submit your entry by emailing your name, phone number, name of organization or business, and description of talk (approximately 100 words) to ONEplace@kpl.gov. Entries are due by 5pm on Friday, January 23

2. Applicants will be notified by Tuesday, January 27

3. Participate in a rehearsal of your talk during the week of Feb 2 (by appointment)

4. Accepted applicants must attend and speak at the Kalamazoo Connect event on Wednesday, February 11, 5-6:30 pm

If you have any questions, please contact ONEplace 269-553-7910 or ONEplace@kpl.gov.

Best,

Thom


Management Track gains traction

ONEplace’s workshop attendance jumped 74% during the last six months of 2014 (compared to same time last year). The huge increase was driven in large part by our new Management Track.

Launched in September 2014, our Management Track includes workshops targeted to managers, executive staff and board members. Events address critical issues, skill development and processes related to delegation, communication, decision making, board development, project management, coaching and more.

Management skills develop continually throughout one’s career. Everyone, regardless of experience level, benefits from refreshing their understanding and assessing their skills in these areas.

Upcoming Management Track workshops include:

Jan 20 – 3 Steps to Improve your Board (Better Board Series)

Jan 22 – Project Management

Jan 27 – Stronger Boards: Recruitment, Onboarding & Retention (Better Board Series)

Feb 17 – Board Membership 101

Feb 25 – Emergency Action Planning

Mar 17 – Coaching for Breakthrough Performance

All events are free of charge and open to nonprofit staff, board members, and volunteers. Registration is required.


Take the Lead

At ONEplace, this marks the midpoint of our three-year plan (July 2013 – June 2016). Leadership development is job ONE stands as one of three pillars of this plan. Here’s an update on this pillar’s progress to date and direction for the coming year.

This past fall, we arrived at our working definition of leadership: taking full responsibility and ownership of your role(s); listening and learning from others, and; teaching and sharing with others. We’re expanding our intensive experience offerings to facilitate development of this type of leadership. 

The ONEplace Nonprofit Leadership Academy offers an intensive development experience for those in supervisory roles at medium to large organizations. Our Peer Learning Groups provide this experience for managers, supervisors, and directors of small to medium organizations. Later this winter/spring, we’ll introduce a retreat experience suitable for anyone wishing to explore their leadership capacity.

We’re also in the midst of pilot testing coaching services for new executive directors within their first year of service. Expect a formalized program to roll out later this year.

Also, expect things to change…hopefully for the better. This continues to be a work in progress for us as we seek to provide an array of events and experiences to meet your and your organization’s leadership development needs.


Our top events in 2014

In the spirit of year-end reflections, we decided to share our Top Ten lists. Recognizing that people vote with their attendance and with their post-session evaluations, we did two lists. Therefore, based upon your evaluations and attendance, here are your top workshops from 2014 (notice ties in both lists).

By evaluation

1. Improve Your Short Writing (4/29/14) 99%

1. Improvising Management (Management Track – 10/30/14) 99%

1. Find Solutions – Solve Problems (Management Track – 11/4/14) 99%

4. How much should a Website Cost (3/6/14) 98%

5. How to Win Grants (4/17/14) 97%

6. Manage by Improvisation (1/24/14) 96%

6. Better Mail Appeals (3/26/14) 96%

6. Google Analytics (4/10/14) 96%

6. Grant Research Tools (6/10/14) 96%

6. Attaining Sustainability (8/26/14) 96%

6. Grant Writing Basics (12/2/14) 96%

6. Improve Your Decision Making (Management Track – 12/4/14) 96%

By attendance

1. Community Alignment (Leadership Series – 10/16/14) 44

2. Communicating for Results (Supervision Series 2 – 9/22/14) 39

3. Job of a Manager (Supervision Series 1 – 9/15/14) 37

4. Building Relationships (Supervision Series 3 – 9/29/14) 36

4. Managing Change (Supervision Series 4 – 10/6/14) 36

6. Leading & Empowering (Supervision Series 5 – 10/13/14) 35

7. Building a Cohesive Team (8/27/14) 34

8. Grant Writing Basics (3/18/14) 32

9. Grant Writing Basics (9/11/14) 29

10. Donor Recognition (Fundraising Series 3 – 10/23/14) 28

Thank you for all you do to support, encourage and enrich our community. You’re amazing people doing amazing work.

All the best for 2015!

Thom

* Management Track and Series designations were introduced in September


Leggo my ego

I enjoy basketball. While some individual players stand out, it’s the performance of the team that decides the game: working together, anticipating each other’s moves, and sharing the spotlight. Sure it takes practice, but it takes more than practice.

It takes trust.

On a team, trust means…

 

  • You hold one another accountable without assigning blame
  • You willingly give and receive extra efforts without keeping track
  • Knowing that the team has your back, you take risks without guilt
  • You communicate openly and directly with your teammates without fear

 

…and you do it all for your mission…for your cause.

Being on a team requires us to extend beyond ourselves. In our recent workshop on Mindfulness in the Workplace, Eric Nelson provided a compelling research- and case-based argument for mindfulness practice. The benefits were so varied and plentiful, I finally asked, “What’s the downside?” Without hesitation, he responded, “It challenges your identity.”

Mindfulness practice makes us face our assumptions and how they often differ from others’ assumptions. It chips away at our ego and helps us recognize how much we need each other to achieve better understanding as well as better performance. By letting go of our need to be right, we free ourselves to be correct. We free ourselves to trust.

I’ve written before on ways to build trust. Yet, these efforts falter when individuals stay wedded to their own assumptions and agendas. The more we understand ourselves and let go of our own egos, the more we open ourselves to trust our teammates. And that’s a step we must take on our own.

The ball is in your court.

Best,

Thom


You're welcome

I expect that every organization and business strives to be hospitable. We want staff, clients, visitors, supporters, and vendors to feel welcomed and comfortable in our place and at our events. Yet, even with best of intentions, we may run into times when we’re stumped.

What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

Some situations may throw us for a loop. Many of us have faltered around language issues, physical challenges, cognitive disabilities, cultural misunderstandings and more.

We can take steps to prepare ourselves and our organizations to be hospitable in these situations: glean your staff’s wisdom by initiating the discussion; identify gaps in understanding and then research and share information at staff meetings; and take advantage of workshops offered by area agencies.

This week, ONEplace welcomes Allison Hammond (Arcadia Institute) to explore Supporting People with Disabilities in your Organization. Allison will help us discover how we can successfully include people with disabilities as participants, volunteers and employees. Plus she will highlight resources to assess and support our ongoing efforts.

Most of us desire an open and welcoming community. It starts with each of us creating that environment right where we are.

Best,

Thom